qui tam

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qui tam

(kwī tam) [L., who as well, who also]
A legal claim or type of litigation in which an individual alleges fraudulent billing by a government contractor. Funds recovered by the government as a result of the claim are divided between the government and the relator of the action. The government is entitled to most of the fraudulently obtained money, and the “whistleblower” is given a percentage of the recovered funds as a reward. Qui tam litigation is one way the U.S. government combats Medicare fraud and abuse.
References in periodicals archive ?
Critics charge that the DOJ is misusing its power to keep the qui tam cases sealed in order to prevent a massive and unprecedented level of war profiteering from becoming public.
A unique factor in qui tam suits is that even if the cases are unsuccessful or companies settle the lawsuits to avoid trial, the facts of the case are eventually made public.
These qui tam cases must eventually be dealt with because the statute of limitations--the amount of time whistleblowers have to file their case--does not run out once the case has been filed.
Whistleblowers and the lawyers who represent them in these qui tam cases are in a tough spot.
This relationship between the whistleblower and the government has seemingly kept most lawyers involved with qui tam cases from speaking out against the DOJ blackout of Iraq contracting fraud suits for fear that doing so would endanger their cases.
Alan Grayson, of Grayson and Kubli PC, a law group specializing in qui tam suits, has struck out on his own to pursue contractor fraud cases without the help of the DOJ.