queen

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queen

Sociology
A commonly used but derogatory term for a male homosexual, especially one who is flamboyantly effeminate.

Vox populi
A female monarch.

queen

a mature, entire female cat used for breeding.
References in periodicals archive ?
Faerie Queene I, vii, 16-18; apud Hamilton et al 2006: 108, 109, 434, 588; Protestants saw in this beast a symbol of "Rome with its seven hills"; cf.
In the Letter to Ralegh, Spenser similarly describes himself as having "fashioned" The Faerie Queene in order "to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline" (7-8).
Spenser's complex allegory offers a variety of interpretations, but Spenser's motivation for the ever-present hatred and ill treatment of the Catholic Church in The Faerie Queene has yet to be studied and analyzed.
That Hideous Strength, a space romance laced with strands of a sinister plot to bend all love to an agenda of social engineering, takes much of its inspiration and material from Books III and IV of The Faerie Queene, with occasional allusions to other parts of the poem in both novels.
WHY DOES PROFESSOR HADFIELD not just tell the truth, that the regime that Spenser wrote The Faerie Queene to glorify was in many respects revolutionary and often appalling?
Also the Fairie Queene quote contains the word paine in it.
Cast of Characters: Edmund Spenser and The Faerie Queene
Thus their prayers for the monarch join further prayers for a series of people most of whom will not be present at the performance, and some of whom cannot even be guaranteed to approve of it: the nobility, the commonweal in general and, most often, as Brathwait and Holles had made clear, the privy council "our Noble Queene Elesabeth, to you we commend, .
While Majeske's conclusion about Utopia is not new, his study of Book V of The Faerie Queene arrives at a persuasive political reading.
In chapter 5, Wells chronicles in depth Spenser's movement from love melancholy to its medieval antecedent, acedia, as famously did Petrarch in his Secretuin, by showing in Arthur's dream of a Faerie Queene how the lost object can be replaced with a substitute sign.
In a lively, relaxed transcription of her 2002 Kathleen Williams Lecture, Lauren Silberman addresses the current state of political approaches to The Faerie Queene, and how the text may be read to deepen and nuance--without apologizing for--Spenser's own political biases.
In The Faerie Queene, Spenser's pastoral vision of Ireland is at its most extensive in Book 6, with Calidore, especially, embodying the experience and dilemmas of the new English settlers.