queen

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queen

Sociology
A commonly used but derogatory term for a male homosexual, especially one who is flamboyantly effeminate.

Vox populi
A female monarch.

queen

a mature, entire female cat used for breeding.
References in periodicals archive ?
Otherwise, we would now have been talking about the United Queendom.
But it is not the case that the Jiu Tangshu locates this queendom only in the east as Denwood (2008: 9), omitting the conflicting statements, insinuates:
leaving possessions and positions, shedding my clothes, forgetting, oh, my name, putting my life on the line, to bring my Julia forth, lesbian woman, who'll masturbate and rule over my body, Earth, parting the waters of my clitoral Queendom, woman in lust, who'll lose her mind and gain her Self in want, in wish, in pure desire and lust for the rosie colored lips covered with hair of Margarita, my yellow margarita.
They have to be willing to contribute energy to Queendom and the community for years to come.
To understand the cultural underpinnings of rice queendom, we begin with a popular stereotype.
15) `Temporarily safe from the violations of the patriarchal household, Zadel and Djuna played in their symbolic, marginalized world, a queendom of "nanophilia"' (Broe, `My Art Belongs to Daddy', p.
QueenDom Inventories (Jerabek, 1996b; 1996c; 1996g) were used to gather psychosocial data.
This political conclusion also underpins the appeal in his long dedication of the poem in which he addresses the "People of the United Queendom and of the United States.
By safeguarding at the top what enters into your personal kingdom, or queendom, you avoid having to de-clutter again later.
It was not until the final Saturday, showing two young Swan Queens magnificently emerging into their queendom, that the production started to take wing.
From all this natural warring among the queendom I find fragments for my cultured fingers.
Mary Lynn Broe and Angela Ingram [Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1989], 53), Broe says, "Temporarily safe from the violations of the patriarchal household, Zadel and Djuna played in their symbolic, marginalized world, a queendom of |nanophilia.