cryptography

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Related to Quantum computing: Quantum cryptography, Quantum entanglement

cryptography

(krip-tog′ră-fē) [ crypt- + -graphy]
The science and techniques of concealing or disguising information through encoding and decoding. In the health professions cryptography is used to ensure the confidentiality of medical records.
References in periodicals archive ?
Also, Quantum computing is an area of research that Intel has been exploring because it has the potential to augment the capabilities of tomorrow's high performance computers.
Previous work in this area, using linear arrangements, only looked at bit-flip errors offering incomplete information on the quantum state of a system and making them inadequate for a quantum computer," said Jay Gambetta, a manager in the IBM Quantum Computing Group.
BT is one of the first companies in a lab to prove real world application for quantum computing.
Caption: A sample of quantum materials produced in the new Institute of Quantum Computing laboratory at the University of Waterloo.
PICs are being developed for other applications like optical sensors, quantum computing and biomedical.
Keywords: qubit, quantum algorithm, classical computing, quantum computing
Current computing relies solely upon 1s and 0s, but quantum computing, first envisioned by physicists like the late Nobel laureate Richard Feynmann, saw so-called "qu-bits," quantum bits that can handle a little of both.
But the computing industry is moving to a new future as disruptive and as radical as that brought by the introduction of silicon chips, and that's quantum computing.
Papers from the workshop are presented here, in sections on quantum cryptography, quantum computing, and physics for quantum information processing.
Quantum computing is a relatively new computing paradigm that is based on transformations performed upon quantum systems.
Quantum computing uses matter -- atoms and molecules -- to process massive amounts of tasks at supercomputing speeds because data is stored and shared in more states rather than the usual binary states of 0 and 1.
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