glutathione synthetase deficiency

(redirected from Pyroglutamic acidemia)

glu·ta·thi·one syn·the·tase de·fi·cien·cy

an inborn error of metabolism associated with massive urinary excretion of 5-oxyproline, elevated levels of 5-oxyproline in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid, severe metabolic acidosis, tendency toward hemolysis, and defective central nervous systems function. Glutathione synthetase deficiency has been reported as a generalized condition or with a deficiency restricted to erythrocytes.

glutathione synthetase deficiency

A rare autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism dur to a mutation in the gene for glutathione synthetase. There are low levels of GLUTATHIONE, raised blood acidity, a tendency to red cell breakdown (haemolysis) and excretion of large quantities of 5-oxoproline in the urine. 5-oxoproline is a stage in the gamma-glutamyl cycle by which amino acids are transported. The antioxidant vitamin E has been used to treat cases.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some disorders, such as propionic acidemia, methylmalonic acidemia, pyroglutamic acidemia, and glutaric acidemia, can be reliably diagnosed from organic acid excretions because of the consistently high increases of characteristic acids.
Pyroglutamic acidemia, or 5-oxoprolinuria, is caused by a glutathione synthetase deficiency, an inherited metabolic condition that may show in early infancy as persistent or acute metabolic acidosis associated with chronic hemolytic anemia (1).
Other ratios of less diagnostic power were those for pyroglutamic acid (pipecolic; m/z 186) to phenylalanine, used in the diagnosis of pyroglutamic acidemia or pipecolic acidemia [33].