pyrogen

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pyrogen

 [pi´ro-jen]
an agent that causes fever; called also pyretic and pyrectic. adj., adj pyrogen´ic.
endogenous pyrogen a low-molecular-weight protein that is produced by phagocytic leukocytes in response to stimulation by exogenous pyrogens and released into the circulation; it induces fever by acting on the preoptic area of the hypothalamus to raise the set-point of the hypothalamic thermostat. The pyrogen produced by monocytes and macrophages is not identical to that produced by neutrophils and eosinophils; the mononuclear phagocytes also produce a greater amount of pyrogen for a longer period of time than do the polymorphonuclear cells.
exogenous p's fever-producing agents of external origin, e.g., bacterial endotoxins and other microbial products, antigen-antibody complexes, viruses and synthetic polynucleotides, incompatible blood and blood products, and androgen breakdown products such as etiocholanolone; the action is mediated by endogenous pyrogen.

py·ro·gen

(pī'rō-jen),
A fever-inducing agent; pyrogens are produced by bacteria, molds, viruses, and yeasts.
[pyro- + G. -gen, producing]

pyrogen

/py·ro·gen/ (pi´ro-jen) a fever-producing substance.

pyrogen

(pī′rə-jən)
n.
A substance that produces fever.

pyrogen

[pī′rəjən]
Etymology: Gk, pyr, fire, genein, to produce
any substance or agent that tends to cause a rise in body temperature, such as some bacterial toxins. See also fever. pyrogenic, adj.

pyrogen

 A fever-inducing substance

py·ro·gen

(pī'rō-jen)
A fever-inducing agent; produced by bacteria, molds, viruses, and yeasts; commonly found in distilled water.
[pyro- + G. -gen, producing]

pyrogen

Any substance that causes fever. Endogenous pyrogens are proteins, such as interleukin-1, released by white blood cells in response to bacterial or viral infections. These act on the temperature-regulating centre in the brain, effectively resetting the thermostat at a higher level and causing the muscles to contract repeatedly and rapidly (shivering) so as to raise body temperature.

pyrogen

any substance which alters the body thermostat of HOMOIOTHERMS to a higher setting, giving rise to fever.

Pyrogen

A chemical circulating in the blood that causes a rise in body temperature.
Mentioned in: Fever

py·ro·gen

(pī'rō-jen)
Fever-inducing agent; produced by bacteria, molds, viruses, and yeasts.
[pyro- + G. -gen, producing]

pyrogen

an agent that causes fever.

endogenous pyrogen (EP)
the mediator of fever, produced by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, monocytes and macrophages.
exogenous pyrogen
lipopolysaccharides and other substances produced by pathogenic microorganisms.
References in periodicals archive ?
Detection of the broad spectrum of pyrogens in pharmaceutical products using the MAT allows improved patient safety and offers the chance to abandon animal tests for pyrogen control.
The traditional methods for pyrogen detection either require animal sacrifice for the Rabbit Pyrogen Test (RPT), or are limited to the detection of endotoxin LPS from the cell walls of gram-negative bacteria (for example in the Limulus Amoebocyte Lysat [LAL] test).
When performing pyrogen testing in pharmaceutical products, the complexity of the human response must be considered.
The MAT employing fresh or cryo-preserved human blood was described and validated as an in vitro pyrogen test [2,3].
The pyrogen concentration in the sample is then determined from the IL-1B concentration via an endotoxin standard curve, and analyzed with the PyroDetect data analysis tool.
The broad pyrogen spectrum detected by the PyroDetect system was evaluated against a set of substances.
regulatory agencies for the test's broader use in lot-release pyrogen testing.
The test's broad applications would address an estimated $50 million market for which there is no reliable in vitro method available for pyrogen detection.