pyoderma gangrenosum

(redirected from Pyoderma granulosa)
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Related to Pyoderma granulosa: pyoderma gangrenosum

pyoderma

 [pi″o-der´mah]
any purulent skin disease.
pyoderma gangreno´sum a rapidly evolving cutaneous ulcer or ulcers, with undermining of the border. Once regarded as a complication peculiar to ulcerative colitis, it is now known to occur in other wasting diseases.

py·o·der·ma gan·gre·no·'sum

a chronic, noninfective eruption of spreading, undermined ulcers showing central healing, with diffuse dermal neutrophil infiltration; often associated with ulcerative colitis.

pyoderma gangrenosum

a rapidly evolving, idiopathic, chronic debilitating skin disease that usually accompanies a systemic disease, especially chronic ulcerative colitis, and is characterized by irregular, boggy, blue-red ulcers with undermined borders surrounding purulent necrotic bases.
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Pyoderma gangrenosum

pyoderma gangrenosum

An uncommon idiopathic condition which begins as papules and pustules in the follicles, followed by a rapidly expanding necrotic ulcer measuring 3 to 30 cm and rimmed by violaceous erythema. At least half of patients have associated systemic disease, including infection, malignancy, vasculitis, collagen vascular disease, diabetes, or trauma; it may have an autoimmune component.

Clinical findings
An initial bite-like lesion, pain, arthralgias and malaise; the classic ulcers occur on the legs; a superficial variant—atypical PG—tends to occur on the hands; involvement of other organ systems manifests as sterile neutrophilic abscesses in the lungs, heart, CNS, GI tract, eyes, liver, spleen, bone, and lymph nodes.
 
Associated conditions
IBD—either ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease, asymmetric polyarthritis, hematologic disorders (e.g., leukaemia or preleukaemia), predominantly myelocytic, monoclonal gammopathies, especially IgA gammopathy. Less common associations include arthritides (e.g., psoriatic arthritis, osteoarthritis, or spondyloarthropathy), liver disease (e.g., hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis), myeloma (especially IgA type) and immunologic diseases (e.g., SLE, Sjögren syndrome).
 
DiffDx
Ulcers due to infection, malignancy, stasis, vasculitis, necrotising fasciitis, acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, aphthous stomatitis, atrophie blanche, Behçet disease, chancroid, Churg-Strauss syndrome (allergic granulomatosis), ecthyma gangrenosum, herpes simplex, hypersensitivity vasculitis (leukocytoclastic vasculitis), impetigo, insect bites, sporotrichosis, squamous cell carcinoma, venous insufficiency, verrucous carcinoma, Wegener’s granulomatosis.
 
Management
Anti-inflammatories (e.g., corticosteroids), immunosuppressants.

pyoderma gangrenosum

Dermatology A rare idiopathic condition characterized by skin ulceration; at least 50% of Pts have associated systemic disease, including infection, malignancy, vasculitis, collagen vascular diseases, DM, trauma Clinical An initial bite-like lesion, pain, arthralgias and malaise; the classic ulcers occur on the legs; a superficial variant, atypical PG, tends to occur on the hands; involvement of other organ systems manifests as sterile neutrophilic abscesses in the lungs, heart, CNS, GI tract, eyes, liver, spleen, bone, and lymph nodes Associated conditions IBD–either ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease, a symmetric polyarthritis,  hematologic disorders–eg, leukemia or preleukemia, predominantly myelocytic, monoclonal gammopathies, especially IgA gammopathy; less common associations include arthritides–eg, psoriatic arthritis, osteoarthritis, or spondyloarthropathy; liver disease–eg, hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis; myeloma–especially IgA type and immunologic diseases–eg, SLE, Sjögren's DiffDx Acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, aphthous stomatitis, atrophie blanche, Behçet disease, chancroid, Churg-Strauss syndrome–allergic granulomatosis, ecthyma, ecthyma gangrenosum, herpes simplex, hypersensitivity vasculitis–leukocytoclastic vasculitis, impetigo, insect bites, sporotrichosis, SCC, venous insufficiency, verrucous carcinoma, Wegener's granulomatosis Management Anti-inflammatories–eg, corticosteroids, immunosuppressants

py·o·der·ma gan·gre·no·sum

(pī'ō-dĕr'mă gang-grĕ-nō'sŭm)
A chronic, noninfective eruption of spreading, undermined ulcers showing central healing, with diffuse dermal neutrophil infiltration; often associated with ulcerative colitis.
Enlarge picture
PYODERMA GANGRENOSUM OF THE LOWER LEG

pyoderma gangrenosum

A rare, ulcerating skin disease in which the skin is infiltrated by neutrophils. It is often found in people with other underlying illnesses, such as inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, or some hematological malignancies.
See: illustration
See also: pyoderma

pyoderma gangrenosum

A rare disease featuring areas of gangrene of the skin, mainly affecting the legs. In spite of the name, the condition is not of infective origin. It occurs in a small percentage of people with ULCERATIVE COLITIS.

pyoderma gangrenosum

erythematous nodules/pustules, which may progress to large spreading ulcers (with blue-black undermined edge and pus-like surface); of unknown cause; may arise idiopathically, but is strongly associated with e.g. inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, myeloma, leukaemia, liver disease; treatment includes steroids and immunosuppressive drugs

pyoderma

any purulent skin disease. Includes pustule, pimple, acne, impetigo and furunculosis.

callus pyoderma
see callus pyoderma.
contagious porcine pyoderma
see contagious porcine pyoderma.
deep pyoderma
bacterial infections involving the dermis and often subcutaneous tissues. There may be systemic illness.
dry pyoderma
see zinc-responsive dermatosis.
fold pyoderma
see fold dermatitis.
pyoderma gangrenosum
a rapidly evolving cutaneous ulcer or ulcers, with undermining of the border.
interdigital pyoderma
infection of the interdigital skin in dogs; may be associated with trauma, Demodex canis infestation, or foreign bodies such as grass seeds.
juvenile pyoderma
a sterile, pustular skin disease on the face and head and sometimes ears, anus and prepuce, in one or more puppies of a litter, usually around weaning age. Dachshunds, Golden retrievers and Gordon setters appear to be predisposed. There is often fever, anorexia and lymphadenopathy, particularly of submandibular lymph nodes which may form abscesses and drain, hence the alternative name of puppy strangles. Staphylococcus spp. are frequently cultured from affected skin, but the etiology of the disease is unclear. Called also juvenile cellulitis, and juvenile sterile granulomatous dermatitis and lymphadenitis.
mucocutaneous pyoderma
occurs on the lip margins and perioral skin of dogs; German shepherd dogs are predisposed.
nasal pyoderma
a deep bacterial folliculitis and furunculosis on the dorsum of the nose in dogs, particularly German shepherd dogs, Bull terriers, Collies and Pointers. Trauma may be a factor in the etiology.
perianal pyoderma
see perianal fistula.
pressure point pyoderma
see pressure points.
skin-fold pyoderma
see fold dermatitis.
superficial pustular pyoderma
surface pyoderma
see acute moist dermatitis.
tail fold pyoderma
see fold dermatitis.