public health

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public health

 
the field of health science that is concerned with safeguarding and improving the physical, mental, and social well-being of the community as a whole. The united states public health service (USPHS) is a federal health agency that is part of the United States Department of Health and Human Services. State and county public health agencies function under the supervision of and with financial support from the Department of Health and Human Services.
public health nursing the branch of nursing concerned with providing nursing care and health guidance to individuals, families, and other population groups in settings such as the home, school, workplace, and other community settings such as medical and health centers. The nurse in this field, a community health nurse, must have a baccalaureate degree and training in public health nursing theory and practice; employment is typically with a local agency such as a nonprofit proprietary organization or with an agency under the United States Department of Health and Human Services. The work involves implementing such programs as school and preschool health programs, immunization and treatment of communicable diseases, maternal and child health clinics, and home visits for the purpose of providing health education and nursing care. There is also frequent participation in educational programs for nurses, allied professional workers, and civic organizations, and involvement in studying, planning, formulating public policy, and putting into action local and national health programs.

pub·lic health

the art and science of community health, concerned with statistics, epidemiology, hygiene, and the prevention and eradication of epidemic diseases; an effort organized by society to promote, protect, and restore the people's health; public health is a social institution, a service, and a practice.

public health

n.
The science and practice of protecting and improving the health of a community, as by preventive medicine, health education, control of communicable diseases, application of sanitary measures, and monitoring of environmental hazards.

public health

Etymology: L, publicus, of the people; AS, haelth
a field of medicine that deals with the physical and mental health of the community, particularly in such areas as water supply, waste disposal, air pollution, and food safety. In the United States there are more than 3000 state, county, or city public health agencies. The U.S. Public Health Service was organized in 1798 to provide hospital care for American merchant seamen. Subsequent legislation has expanded the role of the federal agency to include such services as the Food and Drug Administration; the National Library of Medicine; health care for Native Americans and Alaska Natives; protection against impure and unsafe foods, drugs, cosmetics, and medical devices; control of alcohol and drug abuse; and protection against unsafe radiation-producing projects.

public health

As defined by The Faculty of Public Health Medicine (UK), public health is “The science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting health through organised efforts of society”. Some public health messages have been delivered at national level such as Change4life and smoking cessation.

pub·lic health

(pub'lik helth)
The art and science of community health, concerned with statistics, epidemiology, hygiene, and the prevention and eradication of epidemic diseases; an effort organized by society to promote, protect, and restore the people's health; public health is a social institution, a service, and a practice.

public health

The branch of medicine concerned with prevention of disease (see PREVENTIVE MEDICINE) and the promotion of health in populations by organizing efficient systems of sanitation, by controlling communicable diseases, by ensuring safety in the workplace, by public health education and by the provision and organization of medical, nursing and ancillary health services. An extensive organization of agencies exists to administer public health.

pub·lic health

(pub'lik helth)
Art and science of community health, concerned with statistics, epidemiology, hygiene, and prevention and eradication of epidemic diseases.

public health,

n a field of medicine that deals with the physical and mental health of the community, particularly in such areas as water supply, waste disposal, air pollution, and food safety.
public health authority,
n a governmental agency responsible for matters of public health.
public health dentistry,

public health

the field of human medicine that is concerned with safeguarding and improving the physical, mental and social well-being of the community as a whole. There are marginal roles for veterinarians in this service, especially in the area of zoonoses.

veterinary public health health
the part played by veterinarians in human public health, relating chiefly to the recognition and control of zoonotic disease.

Patient discussion about public health

Q. what is public health insurance

A. Public health insurance programs in the U.S. provide the primary source of health expenses coverage for most seniors and for low-income children and families who meet certain eligibility requirements. The primary public programs are Medicare, a federal social insurance program for seniors and certain disabled individuals and Medicaid, funded jointly by the federal government and states but administered at the state level, which covers certain very low income children and their families. In 2006, there were 47 million people in the United States (16% of the population) who were without health insurance for at least part of that year.

Q. is there any low or any public notify that lets people know a dangerous alcohol can be?

A. alcohol is a drug BUT it is LEGAL an the government gets alot of taxes from it. The companies make a lot of money from people drinking,this is one of the reasons there is no programs about how bad it is. remember the cigerette companys said that smoking was safe 50yrs ago an was lying.cigerettes was proven to cause cancer 50yrs ago. alcohol was proven to cause liver disease???????

More discussions about public health
References in periodicals archive ?
Improving Public Health System Infrastructure in Canada: Report of the Strengthening Public Health System Infrastructure Task Group.
EPHLI Cohort VI fellows engaged in an exercise during their October 2010 session in which they identified 21 environmental public health system research needs.
The public health system includes governmental public health agencies engaged in providing the ten essential public health services, along with other public and private sector entities with missions that affect public health.
He said that the public health system must address the issues of prevention, preparedness, and health disparities.
Late last year the ANF commissioned the workplace research centre to undertake a study of the working conditions of its members in the Victorian public health system.
Hong Kong's public health system turns to private sector for help.
A Health Department spokesman told the Irish Mirror: "The scheme would not just be available to VHI or Bupa customers, but to all in the public health system.
Although Canadians are extremely lucky to have a public health system in place, it is not all-inclusive.
HISTORIC WALK: Director of public health Dr Ruth Hussey, right, and a procession of health workers and actors dressed in Victorian costume and led by a horse and carriage, last night toured the historic Liverpool sites where England's first public health system was pioneered.
A PROCESSION of health workers and actors dressed in Victorian costume and led by a horse and carriage will tonight tour the historic Liverpool sites where England's first public health system was pioneered.
The most important lesson learned from the anthrax attacks was reaffirmation that the public health system is an essential component in homeland security.
Stephanie Mencimer ("Rich Man, Spore Man," December 2001) is tacitly critical of the Republican-led destruction of public health services, and the resultant increase in Americans without health insurance--changes that affect mainly working people and the poor; but she mainly appeals to enlightened self-interest, arguing that citizens must renovate the public health system because an epidemic will harm everyone.

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