stimulant

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stimulant

 [stim´u-lant]
1. producing stimulation, especially by stimulation of muscle fibers through nervous tissue.
2. an agent that has such effects.

stim·u·lant

(stim'yū-lănt),
1. Stimulating; exciting to action.
See also: stimulus.
2. An agent that arouses organic activity, strengthens the action of the heart, increases vitality, and promotes a sense of well-being; classified according to the parts on which they chiefly act: cardiac, respiratory, gastric, hepatic, cerebral, spinal, vascular, genital.
See also: stimulus. Synonym(s): excitor, stimulator
Synonym(s): excitant
[L. stimulans, pres. p. of stimulo, pp. -atus, to goad, incite, fr. stimulus, a goad]

stimulant

/stim·u·lant/ (stim´u-lant)
1. producing stimulation.
2. an agent which stimulates.

central stimulant  a stimulant of the central nervous system.
diffusible stimulant  one that acts quickly and strongly, but transiently.
general stimulant  one that acts upon the whole body.
local stimulant  one that affects only, or mainly, the part to which it is applied.

stimulant

(stĭm′yə-lənt)
n.
An agent, especially a chemical agent such as caffeine, that temporarily arouses or accelerates physiological or organic activity.

stimulant

[stim′yələnt]
Etymology: L, stimulare, to incite
any agent that increases the rate of activity of a body system.

stimulant

adjective Relating to anything that ↑ activity, especially of the nervous system noun Pharmacology Any substance that evokes ↑ activity–eg, a CNS stimulant, cardiovascular stimulant, and others. See Amphetamine, Dextroamphetamine, Ephedrine, Herbal ecstasy, MDMA, Methamphetamine, Methcatinon, Methylphenidate, OTC stimulant, Phenmetrazine, Sexual stimulant.

stim·u·lant

(stim'yū-lănt)
1. Stimulating; exciting to action.
2. An agent that arouses organic activity, strengthens the action of the heart, increases vitality, and promotes a sense of well-being; classified according to the parts on which it chiefly acts: cardiac, respiratory, gastric, hepatic, cerebral, spinal, vascular, or genital.
Synonym(s): stimulator.
See also: stimulus
[L. stimulans, pres. p. of stimulo, pp. -atus, to goad, incite, fr. stimulus, a goad]

stimulant

topical agent stimulating formation of healthy granulation tissue and/or promoting blood flow

stimulant,

n 1., a substance that temporarily increases the physiologic activity of an organ or organ system.
2., a substance that increases nervous excitability and alertness.

stim·u·lant

(stim'yū-lănt)
1. Stimulating; exciting to action.
2. Agent that arouses organic activity, strengthens heart action, increases vitality, and promotes sense of well-being.
Synonym(s): excitant.
[L. stimulans, pres. p. of stimulo, pp. -atus, to goad, incite, fr. stimulus, a goad]

stimulant (stim´ūlənt),

n an agent that causes an increase in functional activity, usually of the central nervous system.
stimulant, abused,
n the substances– such as amphetamines (e.g., methamphetamine or “ice”), cocaine (e.g., “crack” or “coke”), nicotine products (e.g., cigars, cigarettes, or chewing tobacco), and caffeine products (e.g., tea, soft drinks, and soda)–that are misused to increase the functioning of the central nervous system.
stimulant, psychomotor (steroid, psychomotor),
n a drug that increases psychic activity.

stimulant

1. producing stimulation.
2. an agent that stimulates.

Patient discussion about stimulant

Q. How does a Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) unit help fibromyalgia. My aunt was suggested to go through TENS. Will that really help? How does a Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) unit help fibromyalgia?

A. ‘TENS’ units are prescribed for chronic pain sufferers and fibromyalgia patients. What is a tens unit? Tens stands for Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. A tens unit is essentially a stimulation device consisting of electrodes that are attached to the skin, the unit itself, and a battery to provide current. A Tens unit uses electricity to block nerves from sending pain messages.

Q. Can some depression be treated with stimulantes in adults?? I was treated with dextroamphetimins in the 1970's. Why arent they used anymore? I know all of the things about addiction, so I dont need those answers. When the medication was used by me, it worked. My husband is suffereing from depression he has been given all of the "wonder" drugs No results. I hope someone can answer this for me, and for my husbands sake Thank You Shirley

A. Thank you BLars. I am going to talk to my husbands doctor when we have our appointment tomorrow..I get so tired of all of the experts who wont prescribe the right medications because of the abuse potential..CNS Stimulants were used before, and all of us that were on them when we needed them arent worse for wear..I am glad adderall is helping you.Maybe people like us need to speak out, so other patients arent afraid to ask their doctors..Have a great week!!

Shirley

More discussions about stimulant
References in periodicals archive ?
A relatively new category is the intermediate-acting psychostimulants.
Drawing on her elevated intelligence, the support of psychostimulant medication, and the use of organizational strategies, Gail had managed to maintain an average level of academic performance despite her diagnosis of ADHD.
In particular, we were curious about the apparent moral justification of psychostimulants when used for the purpose of study enhancement (DeSantis & Hane, 2010).
Changes in heart rate and blood pressure generally are not clinically significant in patients taking psychostimulants (average increases: 1 or 2 beats per minute and 1 to 4 mm Hg for systolic and diastolic blood pressures).
Based on previous reports, we hypothesized that sauchinone might have an effect on psychostimulant induced behavioral changes.
2006) compared traditional undergraduate students with students over 24 years of age (whom they defined as nontraditional), and found fewer of the older students misused prescription psychostimulants than traditional students.
Fifty per cent (n = 590) presented lifetime use of psychostimulants (cocaine and/or ecstasy) [33.
Psychostimulants such as intravenous, intranasal, and smoked cocaine also activate the HPA axis, increasing the secretion of cortisol (Mello and Mendelson 1997).
Psychostimulants such as Adderall (dextroamphetamine), for example, once considered to involve too many risks to justify medical benefit, have enjoyed renewed medical legitimacy with the "discovery" of adult ADHD.
Caffeine and nicotine are some of the most widely used psychostimulants.
The group of hallucinogenic psychostimulants that are often found at 'raves' includes all of following drugs EXCEPT:
Tranquilizers feel like having completed a day's work and deserving to relax in the midst of conflicts; psychostimulants feel like being about to reach some exciting point or being able to solve all problems; opiates feel like being suddenly accepted and nurtured by family or clan while socially isolated.