psychosomatic medicine

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medicine

 [med´ĭ-sin]
1. any drug or remedy.
2. the art and science of the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.
3. the nonsurgical treatment of disease.
alternative medicine see complementary and alternative medicine.
aviation medicine the branch of medicine that deals with the physiologic, medical, psychologic, and epidemiologic problems involved in flying.
ayurvedic medicine the traditional medicine of India, done according to Hindu scriptures and making use of plants and other healing materials native to India.
behavioral medicine a type of psychosomatic medicine focused on psychological means of influencing physical symptoms, such as biofeedback or relaxation.
clinical medicine
1. the study of disease by direct examination of the living patient.
2. the last two years of the usual curriculum in a medical college.
complementary medicine (complementary and alternative medicine (CAM)) a large and diverse set of systems of diagnosis, treatment, and prevention based on philosophies and techniques other than those used in conventional Western medicine, often derived from traditions of medical practice used in other, non-Western cultures. Such practices may be described as alternative, that is, existing as a body separate from and as a replacement for conventional Western medicine, or complementary, that is, used in addition to conventional Western practice. CAM is characterized by its focus on the whole person as a unique individual, on the energy of the body and its influence on health and disease, on the healing power of nature and the mobilization of the body's own resources to heal itself, and on the treatment of the underlying causes, rather than symptoms, of disease. Many of the techniques used are the subject of controversy and have not been validated by controlled studies.
emergency medicine the medical specialty that deals with the acutely ill or injured who require immediate medical treatment. See also emergency and emergency care.
experimental medicine study of the science of healing diseases based on experimentation in animals.
family medicine family practice.
forensic medicine the application of medical knowledge to questions of law; see also medical jurisprudence. Called also legal medicine.
group medicine the practice of medicine by a group of physicians, usually representing various specialties, who are associated together for the cooperative diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease.
internal medicine the medical specialty that deals with diagnosis and medical treatment of diseases and disorders of internal structures of the body.
legal medicine forensic medicine.
nuclear medicine the branch of medicine concerned with the use of radionuclides in diagnosis and treatment of disease.
patent medicine a drug or remedy protected by a trademark, available without a prescription.
physical medicine physiatry.
preclinical medicine the subjects studied in medicine before the student observes actual diseases in patients.
preventive medicine the branch of medical study and practice aimed at preventing disease and promoting health.
proprietary medicine any chemical, drug, or similar preparation used in the treatment of diseases, if such article is protected against free competition as to name, product, composition, or process of manufacture by secrecy, patent, trademark, or copyright, or by other means.
psychosomatic medicine the study of the interrelations between bodily processes and emotional life.
socialized medicine a system of medical care regulated and controlled by the government; called also state medicine.
space medicine the branch of aviation medicine concerned with conditions encountered by human beings in space.
sports medicine the field of medicine concerned with injuries sustained in athletic endeavors, including their prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.
state medicine socialized medicine.
travel medicine (travelers' medicine) the subspecialty of tropical medicine consisting of the diagnosis and treatment or prevention of diseases of travelers.
tropical medicine medical science as applied to diseases occurring primarily in the tropics and subtropics.
veterinary medicine the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of animals other than humans.

psy·cho·so·mat·ic med·i·cine

the study and treatment of diseases, disorders, or abnormal states in which psychologic processes resulting in physiologic reactions are believed to play a prominent role.

psychosomatic medicine

the branch of medicine concerned with the interrelationships between mental and emotional reactions and somatic processes, in particular the manner in which intrapsychic conflicts influence physical symptoms. It maintains that the body and mind are one inseparable entity and that both physiological and psychological techniques should be applied in the study and treatment of illness. Also called psychosomatics.

psychosomatic medicine

A “holistic” philosophy of healthcare, which assumes that an individual’s mental state is intimately linked to both the pathogenesis of disease and ultimately to its treatment.

psy·cho·so·mat·ic med·i·cine

(sī'kō-sŏ-mat'ik med'i-sin)
The study and treatment of diseases, disorders, or abnormal states in which psychological processes resulting in physiologic reactions are believed to play a prominent role.

psy·cho·so·mat·ic med·i·cine

(sī'kō-sŏ-mat'ik med'i-sin)
Study and treatment of diseases, disorders, or abnormal states in which psychologic processes resulting in physiologic reactions are believed to play a prominent role.
References in periodicals archive ?
Adults are suffering from panic disorders, depression and psychosomatic disorders as they struggle to cope with the deeply inhuman situation.
The OPD is based on five axes: experience of illness and prerequisites for treatment, interpersonal relations, conflict, personality structure, and mental and psychosomatic disorders.
Mr Aehmed's counsel, Graham Brodie, said his client was suffering at the time of the applications from psychosomatic disorders.
Because the accountant was educated and clear thinking--both in concrete areas as well as in abstract ones--I was able to introduce the ideas of many schools of thought in the area of psychosomatic disorders.
Setting unachievable goals can accentuate depression, anorexia nervosa, bulimia, migraine, personality and psychosomatic disorders, Type A coronary-prone behaviours, suicide and decreased productivity.
Emotional effects include loneliness, insecurity, humiliation, fear of school, insomnia, and mood swings, as well as depression, agoraphobia, fear of strangers, anxiety attacks, psychosomatic disorders, eating disorders, and suicide.
Further chapters cover use of hypnosis for smoking control, eating disorders, anxiety, concentration, insomnia, phobias, psychosomatic disorders and much more.
John Blofeld wrote in the introduction to the book that the Buddhist concept of healing marvelously anticipates the growing realization in the West that most illnesses, however physical their symptoms, are in fact psychosomatic disorders, or arise therefrom.
From there he studied for his Diploma in Psychological Medicine before going on to work at Mill Hill Emergency Hospital, London, where he began working on the psychosomatic disorders, which would become his life's obsession.
When I retired from active surgery in 1972 I decided to devote my energies to treating psychosomatic disorders and a range of other complaints.
More importantly, biracial youth may experience depression or exhibit maladaptive behaviors such as substance abuse, psychosomatic disorders, and suicidal ideation (Herring, 1995; Poston, 1990; Winn & Priest, 1993).
No detailed nationwide survey on the problems has been conducted despite increases in the number of children suffering from psychosomatic disorders reported amid the growing ''classroom collapse'' phenomenon where class discipline breaks down to the point where teaching becomes impossible.