psychosocial development


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Related to psychosocial development: Cognitive development

development

 [de-vel´up-ment]
1. growth and differentiation.
cognitive development the development of intelligence, conscious thought, and problem-solving ability that begins in infancy.
community health development in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as facilitating members of a community to identify the community's health concerns, mobilize resources, and implement solutions.
critical path development in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as constructing and using a timed sequence of patient care activities to enhance desired patient outcomes in a cost-efficient manner. See also critical path.
program development in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as planning, implementing, and evaluating a coordinated set of activities designed to enhance wellness or to prevent, reduce, or eliminate one or more health problems of a group or community.
psychosexual development
1. generally, the development of the psychological aspects of sexuality from birth to maturity.
2. In psychoanalytic theory, the development of object relations has five stages: the oral stage from birth to 2 years, the anal stage from 2 to 4 years, the phallic stage from 4 to 6 years, the latency stage from 6 years until puberty, and the genital stage from puberty onward; see also sexual development.
psychosocial development the development of the personality, including the acquisition of social attitudes and skills, from infancy through maturity.
risk for delayed development a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as being at risk for delay of 25 per cent or more in one or more of the areas of social or self-regulatory behavior, or in cognitive, language, gross motor, or fine motor skills.
sexual development see sexual development.
staff development
1. an educational program for health care providers conducted by a hospital or other institution; it includes orientation, in-service training, and continuing education.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as developing, maintaining, and monitoring competence of staff.

psychosocial development

(in child development) a description devised by Erik Erikson of the normal serial development of trust (birth to 12 months), autonomy (1 to 2 years), initiative (3 to 5 years), industry, identity (12 to 18 years), intimacy, generativity, and ego integrity (60s and above). The development begins in infancy and progresses as the infantile ego interacts with the environment. For the child to reach a new stage successfully, the tasks of the preceding one should be fully mastered.

psychosocial development

Psychiatry Progressive interaction between a person and her environment through stages beginning in infancy, ending in adulthood, which loosely parallels psychosexual development. See Cognitive development.
References in periodicals archive ?
Regarding certain self-conceived indices, we compared some body image subscales and psychosocial development in both groups, and found that "Appearance evaluation" and "Fitness evaluation" related to body image subscales had a negative correlation with psychosocial development (Table 3).
2,12) However, all the differences in psychosocial development were consistently in disfavour of the subjects born from unwanted pregnancies, especially among those who were only children.
The study on the links between food insufficiency and cognitive, academic, and psychosocial development was published in Pediatrics (108(I): 44-53, July 2001).
Snarey's results suggest that studying paternal involvement in childcare and previous psychosocial development as predictors of fathers' generativity may be a fruitful area of inquiry in diverse samples of fathers.
Assessment of the child characteristics at seizure onset will provide the nurse with knowledge about the child's temperament, behavior, self-concept, psychosocial development and neurological functioning.
cognitive/perceptual and psychosocial development must be taken into
Psychosocial development encompasses a crisis known as autonomy versus doubt (Erikson, 1968, 1977).
A difficult transition in forming new friendship networks is likely to threaten immigrant youths' optimal psychosocial development and promote vulnerability to being marginalized.
When deciding which settings and techniques to use with adolescents during wartime, it is especially important to consider their psychosocial development, their moral development, and their individual life roles.
The after-school program is committed to the educational and psychosocial development of Mercy Housing residents.
He explains who these children are, beliefs about them, their needs, understanding them in the context of Erikson's theory of psychosocial development, myths about giftedness, specific issues, principles, how students cope with expectations, and the role of various influences on their lives.
The rest of the book describes physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development from infancy through old age.
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