psychophysics

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psychophysics

 [si″ko-fiz´iks]
scientific study of the quantitative relations between characteristics or patterns of physical stimuli and the sensations induced by them.

psy·cho·phys·ics

(sī'kō-fiz'iks),
The science of the relation between the physical attributes of a stimulus and the measured, quantitative attributes of the mental perception of that stimulus (for example, the relationship between changes in decibel level and the corresponding changes in the human's perception of the sound).

psychophysics

/psy·cho·phys·ics/ (-fiz´iks) scientific study of quantitative relations between characteristics or patterns of physical stimuli and the sensations induced by them.

psychophysics

(sī′kō-fĭz′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The branch of psychology that deals with the relationships between physical stimuli and sensory response.

psy′cho·phys′i·cal adj.
psy′cho·phys′i·cal·ly adv.
psy′cho·phys′i·cist (-fĭz′ĭ-sĭst) n.

psychophysics

[-fiz′iks]
Etymology: Gk, psyche + physikos, natural
the branch of psychology concerned with the relationships between physical stimuli and sensory responses.

psy·cho·phys·ics

(sī'kō-fiz'iks)
The science of the relation between the physical attributes of a stimulus and the measured, quantitative attributes of the mental perception of that stimulus.

psychophysics

the study of the relationships between the subjectively perceived magnitude of sensations and their actual magnitude, particularly with regard to the ability to detect differences between stimuli of different magnitudes.

psychophysics 

Branch of science that deals with the relationship between the physical stimuli and the sensory response. The measurements of thresholds (e.g. visual acuity, dark adaptation) or matching of stimuli (as in the spectral luminous efficiency curve) are examples of psychophysics. See experimental optometry.

psy·cho·phys·ics

(sī'kō-fiz'iks)
Science of relation between physical attributes of a stimulus and measured quantitative attributes of mental perception of that stimulus.
References in periodicals archive ?
The procedure was based on the psychophysical method of limits, in which the stimuli that are presented across trials vary monotonically along a perceptual dimension.
Jenkins is a recognized expert in learning-based brain plasticity, behavioral algorithms, and psychophysical methods, as well as multimedia and Internet technology.
Recently, other psychophysical methods, including the method of constant stimuli and two alternative forced-choice methods, have been used in perceptual scaling experiments (Ariely, 2001; Chong & Treisman, 2003).