psychologism

(redirected from Psychologistic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

psychologism

(sī-kŏl′ə-jĭz′əm)
n.
The explanation or interpretation of events or ideas in psychological terms.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this sense, some authors suggest that it is as important to recognize the presence of ecological fallacy as to recognize psychologistic or individualistic fallacy (Subramanian et al.
Cognitive perception and appreciation are commonly unconscious, psychoanalysis concerns itself with the individual and in accordance with some version of psychologistic determinism, and cognitive dispositions may give rise to unconscious emotional reactions which help reproduce subordination.
Subjective and objective forms of skeptical relativism arise on psychologistic soil (skepticism can be defeated in affirming the validity of self-evident, universal claims).
He famously repudiated this psychologistic picture but, as a result, found no place for value within the realm of perceptible phenomena.
Thus, the properties of bodies that count as basic do not include vital, psychologistic, or aesthetic properties.
In A Room of One's Own, Woolf offers a socio-political, rather than a psychologistic and deterministic explanation as to why a "good, capable, conscientious woman" is not likely to have access to the same exalted status of truth as the male artist.
If by 1900 Husserl came to reject his mentor's psychologistic assumptions, he always adhered to the appeal for philosophical clarity and universality.
having elaborated a finally psychologistic conception thereof, insofar as the traditional reference to particular examples seems to compromise the degree of abstraction that logic seems properly to require.
It is difficult for us moderns--with our heavily psychologistic model of the human personality, our notion of unconscious drives, our tendency to associate desire with sexuality, and our heightened sensitivity to anything that might seem to contravene the strict protocols of heterosexual masculinity--it is difficult for us to avoid reading into such passionate expressions of male love a suggestion of 'homoeroticism' at the very least, if not of 'latent homosexuality' [.
The poet in question is Petrarch, and the classical monolith into which he painfully collided is Ovid, whose poem of change, the Metamorphoses, is made relentlessly stable by "its visual and rhetorical clarity, its calm impersonality, its security within nature, its accommodations with suffering, its refusal of psychologistic paradox, and its capacity for repose" (131).
A similar observation informed Freud's psychologistic reduction of religion, which he interpreted as merely a 'projection' of infantile needs and conflicts.
Popper believes that the psychologistic account of normal research legitimates an image of science that is a "danger to our civilization".