Psychodynamic therapy

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Psychodynamic therapy

A therapeutic approach that assumes dysfunctional or unwanted behavior is caused by unconscious, internal conflicts and focuses on gaining insight into these motivations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Individual, four times/weekly, psychodynamic psychotherapy is provided by doctors on staff.
As one carefully reviews the available studies on therapeutic outcomes, one should note that effective treatment frequently involves some combination of CBT, interpersonal therapies, and psychopharmacological interventions, although empirical support for the efficacy of psychodynamic psychotherapy is also now more readily available (Shedler's [2010] article on "The efficacy of psychodynamic psychotherapy" published in the American Psychologist cites several empirical studies supporting the efficacy of psychodynamic psychotherapy in the treatment of various psychopathologies).
The final chapter integrates the role of developmental thinking in psychodynamic psychotherapy.
MI is compatible with evidence-based clinical skills and a variety of psychotherapy perspectives, including psychodynamic psychotherapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, experiential therapy, and family systems theory.
The theoretical models which have informed the treatment approach of the programme include cognitive-behavioural therapy, attachment theory, psychodynamic psychotherapy, mentalisation and systems theory.
The comprehensive multi-disciplinary team includes medical, nursing, psychology, DBT, CBT, psychodynamic psychotherapy, family therapy, occupational therapy, social work and education.
Comparing cognitive behavior therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, and psychodynamic psychotherapy.
A discussion of the intentional incarnational integration in relational psychodynamic psychotherapy.
Washington, Jan 25 (ANI): Psychodynamic psychotherapy is effective for a number of mental health symptoms and its benefits grow after treatment has ended, a new study says.
There are various forms of psychotherapy ranging from cognitive behavioural therapy, which looks at the way you think and the effects this has on your behaviour, to psychodynamic psychotherapy, which was invented by Sigmund Freud and looks at how traumatic events from your childhood may be influencing the way you see the world as an adult.
2002) and six other more focused metaanalyses that examined treatment effects for short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy versus other treatments for various patient conditions (Leichsenring, Rabung, & Leibing, 2004), sex-offenders (Losel & Schmucker, 2005), CBT for panic disorder with and without agoraphobia (Mitte, 2005), CBT and self-regulatory treatments for chronic low back pain (Hoffman, Papas, Chatkoff, & Kerns, 2007), and child and adolescent disorders (mostly externalizing problems and depression; Weisz, Jensen-Doss, & Hawley, 2006; Weisz, Valeri, & McCarty, 2006).
Psychotherapy as Religion goes on to demonstrate how psychodynamic psychotherapy, behavioral therapy, and cognitive-behavioral therapy are all rooted in an American mythology that exalts "heroic individualism", placing responsibility squarely on the individual's shoulders and utterly ignoring contributing factors from society.