psychodynamics

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psychodynamics

 [si″ko-di-nam´iks]
the science of mental forces and motivations that influence human behavior and mental activity, including recognition of the role of unconscious motivation in human behavior.

psy·cho·dy·nam·ics

(sī'kō-dī-nam'iks),
The systematized study and theory of the psychological forces that underlie human behavior, emphasizing the interplay between unconscious and conscious motivation and the functional significance of emotion. See: role-playing.
[psycho- + G. dynamis, force]

psychodynamics

/psy·cho·dy·nam·ics/ (-di-nam´iks) the interplay of motivational forces that gives rise to the expression of mental processes, as in attitudes, behavior, or symptoms.

psychodynamics

(sī′kō-dī-năm′ĭks, -dĭ-)
n.
1. (used with a sing. or pl. verb) The interaction of various conscious and unconscious mental or emotional processes, especially as they influence personality, behavior, and attitudes.
2. (used with a sing. verb) The study of personality and behavior in terms of such processes.

psy′cho·dy·nam′ic adj.
psy′cho·dy·nam′i·cal·ly adv.

psychodynamics

[-dīnam′iks]
Etymology: Gk, psyche + dynamis, power
the study of the forces that motivate behavior. It may include the influence of past experiences on present behavior and the influence of mental and emotional forces on development and behavior.

psy·cho·dy·nam·ics

(sī'kō-dī-nam'iks)
The systematized study and theory of the psychological forces that underlie human behavior, emphasizing the interplay between unconscious and conscious motivation and the functional significance of emotion.
See also: role-playing
[psycho- + G. dynamis, force]

psy·cho·dy·nam·ics

(sī'kō-dī-nam'iks)
Systematized study and theory of psychological forces that underlie human behavior, emphasizing interplay between unconscious and conscious motivation.
[psycho- + G. dynamis, force]
References in periodicals archive ?
Next, the criteria for organisational learning according to the systems psychodynamic perspective were investigated (Bain 1998; Campbell & Huffington 2008:78; French & Vince 1999:7-19; Meznar & Nicolini 1995).
Topics addressed include systems of infant, toddler, and young child care; sensory integration and sensory processing disorders; pathophysiology of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in patients with ADHD and FASD; therapeutic interventions for substance abusing mothers; adult neuropsychology of FASD; identification and treatment of social communication deficits in children with FASD; multi-modal management strategies for FASD through the lifespan; and a psychodynamic perspective on FASD in the adult.
The impact of Internet pornography on married women; a psychodynamic perspective.
Psycotherapy With African American Women: Innovations in Psychodynamic Perspectives And Practice edited by Leslie C.
Specific topics include: a historical background of dogmatism, influential factors that shape adult dogmatism, cognitive and behavioral characteristics, the question of whether man is hardwired to short-circuit reason, neoronal hardware and dogmatism, developmental theory on critical milestones of the first two years that contribute to dogmatic belief, and psychodynamic perspectives on the phenomenon.
It offers important tools for clinicians working with individuals, families, and groups, as w ell as educators and students interested in psychodynamic perspectives on trauma.
Drawing on identity politics, psychodynamic perspectives, and the self-photography of Cindy Sherman and Morimura Yasumasa, she examines the relationship between self- and perceived identity and cases where the visible image fails to represent felt identity (as in the case of femme lesbians).