Psychodynamic


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Psychodynamic: Psychodynamic theory, Psychodynamic perspective

Psychodynamic

A therapy technique that assumes improper or unwanted behavior is caused by unconscious, internal conflicts and focuses on gaining insight into these motivations.
Mentioned in: Group Therapy, Suicide
References in periodicals archive ?
Comparing cognitive behavior therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, and psychodynamic psychotherapy.
I prefer to envision a continuum [ranging] from psychoanalysis through the exploratory psychodynamic therapies in which transferences are invited to emerge and be examined in light of the client's history, then the transference-focused or expressive treatments that zero in on the here-and-now use of pathological defenses, and finally, the supportive approaches for people who are in crisis or are struggling with severe psychopathology or are simply unable to afford treatments of more than a few sessions.
Although psychodynamic therapy is now seeking validation through clinical trials, evidence, so far, supports the use of therapies that focus on the present rather than the past.
Psychodynamic Unravels emotions, integrates traumatic event into patient's self-concept
Simply applying a private practice psychodynamic therapy model to children in the foster care system is not the solution.
It is hoped that the PDM will affect reimbursement policies by documenting the need for longer-term psychodynamic approaches, said Dr.
theory was psychodynamic, followed in order of frequency by
Most books about psychodynamic ideas are aimed at psychoanalysts and psychotherapists and tend to be complex.
A group of 193 women who met DSM-III-R criteria for current major depressive disorder were randomized to treatment with routine primary care (control), cognitive behavioral therapy, psychodynamic therapy, and nondirective counseling.
His interpreting framework is based on three perspectives: dialogical (Bakhtin's imagery of moral and grotesque), psychoanalytic (men's psychodynamic encounters with motherhood) and gendered (duality and fluidity of gender).
And as if simply disentangling the psychodynamic threads of these complicated denouements were not enough, Gabler-Hover also makes effective use of Homi Bhabha's notion of "splitting": Hagar's illicit sexuality is split onto blackness, but its product, the empowerment t hat such sexuality makes possible, is split onto whiteness.
It almost complete ignores the role of Sigmund Freud and the rise of psychodynamic thought in early 20th-century America in fostering the nation's obsession with psychological problems and happiness.