psychedelic

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Related to Psychedelics: DMT

psychedelic

 [si″kĕ-del´ik]
pertaining to or characterized by hallucinations, distortions of perception and awareness, and sometimes psychotic-like behavior; also, a drug producing such effects (see also hallucinogen). Psychedelic drugs include lsd and mescaline.

psy·che·del·ic

(sī'kĕ-del'ik),
1. Pertaining to a rather imprecise category of drugs with mainly central nervous system action, and with effects said to be the expansion or heightening of consciousness, for example, LSD, hashish, mescaline, psilocybin.
2. A hallucinogenic substance, visual display, music, or other sensory stimulus having such action.
Synonym(s): hallucinogenic
[psyche- + G. dēloō, to manifest]

psychedelic

/psy·che·del·ic/ (si″kĭ-del´ik)
1. pertaining to or characterized by hallucinations, distortions of perception and awareness, and sometimes psychotic-like behavior.
2. a drug that produces such effects.

psychedelic

(sī′kĭ-dĕl′ĭk)
adj.
Of, characterized by, or generating hallucinations, distortions of perception, altered states of awareness, and occasionally states resembling psychosis.
n.
A drug, such as LSD or mescaline, that produces psychedelic effects.

psy′che·del′i·cal·ly adv.

psychedelic

[sī′kədel′ik]
Etymology: coined in 1956 by Humphry Osmond from Gk, psyche + deloun, to reveal
1 describing a mental state characterized by altered sensory perception and hallucination accompanied by euphoria or fear, usually caused by the deliberate ingestion of drugs or other substances known to produce this effect.
2 describing any drug or substance that causes this state, such as mescaline or psilocybin.

psy·che·del·ic

(sī'kĕ-del'ik)
1. Pertaining to a category of drugs with mainly central nervous system action, said to be the expansion or heightening of consciousness (e.g., LSD, hashish, mescaline).
2. A hallucinogenic substance, visual display, music, or other sensory stimulus having such action.
Synonym(s): hallucinogenic.
[psyche- + G. dēloō, to manifest]

psychedelic,

adj 1. pertaining to a mental state distinguished by the presence of hallucinations and an alteration in the sensation of perception. The affected person may also report feelings of fear or euphoria.
adj 2. pertaining to a specific substance or drug, such as mescaline; known to produce mood-altering effects.
References in periodicals archive ?
At a less-organized end of the spectrum is simply the spiritual use of psychedelics by numerous practitioners outside of any particular shamanic or religious tradition for the purposes of growth, insight, and healing.
Abstract--This article investigates the influence of perception that is altered by psychedelic drugs on processes of creativity through a case study of the work of well-known comic artist Robert Crumb.
But Garcia once summed up a most admirable anti-message about what the Dead experience meant: "A combination of music and the psychedelic experience taught me to fear power.
Given that psychedelic drug dose is said to be a crucial factor influencing whether an occasion of use is capable of catalyzing a transformational mystical experience, we expected to find that the usual dosage taken as reported by users for the full psychedelics LSD and psilocybin, but not MDMA or nonpsychedelic drugs such as cannabis, cocaine, opiates or alcohol, would be positively related to self-reported mystical experiences as well as to experiences of an "overwhelming" nature.
Perhaps the activation of endogenous psychedelics found in the brain such as DMT--which, based on the availability of certain neurochemicals, is speculated but certainly not proven to be made in the pineal gland (Roney-Dougal, 2001; Strassman, 2001)--underlies both factors, resulting in subjective paranormal experiences.
The Sonics, or the rad psychedelic secret Janis I have.
Keywords--coping skills, psychedelics, quality of life, self assessment, spirituality
In a more rigorous version of the classic "Good Friday Experiment" of 1962, researchers at Johns Hopkins recruited 30 subjects who had never used psychedelics but who reported "regular participation in religious or spiritual activities.
And, all the ways that psychedelics can expand one's mind can also be achieved without them--definitely.
Nutt said Scotland could lead a "new neuroscientific enlightenment" by using illegal drugs including psychedelics and MDMA.
Dreams and Resurrection: On Immortal Selves, Psychedelics, and Christianity