Pseudomonas

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Pseudomonas

 [soo″do-mo´nas]
a genus of gram-negative, strictly aerobic, motile, straight or curved rod-shaped bacteria. Most species are saprophytic, but some are pathogenic for plants and animals. P. aerugino´sa (which produces the pigments pyocyanin and fluorescein that give a characteristic blue color to the pustular discharge of some suppurative infections) is a major agent of severe or fatal nosocomial infections in debilitated patients. Some species are opportunistic pathogens in humans; these include P. alcali´genes, P. cepa´cia, P. fluores´cens, P. mal´lei (which also causes glanders in horses), P. maltophi´lia, P. pseudomal´lei, and P. stut´zeri.

Pseudomonas

(sū'dō-mō'nas),
A genus of motile, polar-flagellate, non-spore-forming, strictly aerobic bacteria (family Pseudomonadaceae) containing straight or curved, but not helical, gram-negative rods that occur singly. The metabolism is respiratory, never fermentative. They occur commonly in soil and in freshwater and marine environments. Some species are plant pathogens. Others are involved in human infections. The type species is Pseudomonas aeruginosa.
[pseudo- + G. monas, unit, monad]

Pseudomonas

/Pseu·do·mo·nas/ (-mo´nas) a genus of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria, some species of which are pathogenic for plants and vertebrates. P. aerugino´sa produces the blue-green pigment pyocyanin, which gives the color to “blue pus” and causes various human diseases; P. acido´vorans, P. alcali´genes, P. fluores´cens, P. picket´tii, P. pseudoalcali´genes, P. pu´tida, P. putrefa´ciens, P. stut´zeri, and P. vesicula´ris are opportunistic pathogens.

pseudomonas

(so͞o′də-mō′nəs, so͞o-dŏm′ə-nəs)
n. pl. pseudo·monades (-mŏn′ə-dēz′)
Any of various gram-negative, rod-shaped, mostly aerobic flagellated bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas, commonly found in soil, water, and decaying matter, and including some plant and animal pathogens.

Pseudomonas

[so̅o̅dom′ənas]
Etymology: Gk, pseudes + monas, unit
a genus of gram-negative bacteria isolated from wounds, burns, and infections of the urinary tract that includes several free-living species in soil and water and some opportunistic pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pseudomonads are notable for their fluorescent pigments and their resistance to disinfectants and antibiotics.

Pseu·do·mo·nas

(sūdŏ-mōnăs)
A genus of motile, polar-flagellate, non-spore-forming, strictly aerobic bacteria (family Pseudomonadaceae) containing gram-negative rods that occur singly. The metabolism is oxidative. They occur commonly in soil and in freshwater and marine environments. Some species are plant pathogens. Others are involved in human infections. The type species is P. aeruginosa.
[pseudo- + G. monas, unit, monad]

Pseudomonas

(soo-do-mo'nas) [? + monas, single]
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, motile bacilli with polar flagella. Most are saprophytic, living in soil and decomposing organic matter. Some produce blue and yellow pigments.
Enlarge picture
Psuedomonas Aeruginosa: infection of the distal foot

Pseudomonas aeruginosa

A species that produces a distinctive blue-green pigment, grows readily in water, and may cause life-threatening infections in humans, including nosocomial pneumonia, urinary tract infections, and sepsis. It may also cause folliculitis, malignant otitis externa, and skin infections in patients who have suffered burns. See: illustration

Pseudomonas cepacia

Burkholderia cepacia.

Pseudomonas mallei

See: Burkholderia

Pseudomonas maltophilia

See: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa

A variant of P. aeruginosa that resists both phagocytosis and antibiotic treatment by secreting a slimy protective coating (alginate slime). It is more virulent than nonmucoid-secreting forms of P. aeruginosa and often colonizes patients with bronchiectasis or cystic fibrosis.

Pseudomonas oryzihabitans

A gram-negative rod that can cause health care–related infections, esp. in catheterized, immunosuppressed, or critically ill patients. It was formerly known as Flavimonas oryzihabitans.

Pseudomonas pseudomallei

Burkholderia pseudomallei.

Pseudomonas

A genus of GRAM NEGATIVE bacteria widely found in nature and responsible for much decomposition of organic matter. Pseudomonas species, especially P. aeruginosa , cause many serious, especially OPPORTUNISTIC, infections and produce a bluish-green pus.

Pseu·do·mo·nas

(sūdŏ-mōnăs)
A genus of motile, polar-flagellate, non-spore-forming bacteria that occur commonly in soil and in fresh-water and marine environments. Some species that are involved in human infections. The type species is P. aeruginosa.
[pseudo- + G. monas, unit, monad]

Pseudomonas

a genus of gram-negative, strictly aerobic bacteria, some species of which are pathogenic for plants and vertebrates.

Pseudomonas aeruginosa
a common isolate from wounds, burns and urinary tract infections and from many other accumulations of pus in all species. Also commonly found in otitis externa, fleece rot in sheep, and some cases of bovine mastitis. Its presence may be indicated by a distinctive blue or green color of the pus or infected site.
Pseudomonas fluorescens
a common cause of food spoilage and a frequent isolate from wounds and other contaminated sites in animals.
Pseudomonas mallei
see burkholderia mallei.
Pseudomonas pseudomallei
see burkholderia pseudomallei.
Pseudomonas putida
causes septicemia in aquarium fish.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cloning of a creatinase gene from Pseudomonas putida in Escherichia coli by using an indicator plate.
Table 1: Demographic and clinical data of patients with Pseudomonas putida meningitis (revised).
Chen, Pseudomonas putida KT2442 as a platform for the biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates with adjustable monomer contents and compositions.
Interesterification of butter fat by partially purified extracellular lipases from Pseudomonas putida, Aspergillus niger and Rhizopus oryzae.
Biodegradation of petroleum and crude oil by Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus cereus.
Factors influencing the ability of Pseudomonas putida strains epI and epII to degrade the organophosphate ethoprophos.
Pseudomonas putida KT2440 fue cultivada en 5 ml de medio LB, crecida toda la noche y a partir de este cultivo se inocularon 30 [micron]l en 50 ml de medio de cultivo LBcon cloranfenicol 50[micron]g/ml ([Cm.
27] Gravel V, Antoun H and RJ Tweddell Growth stimulation and fruit yield improvement of greenhouse tomato plants by inoculation with Pseudomonas putida or Trichoderma atroviride: Possible role of indole acetic acid (IAA).
The Pseudomonas putida IFO 14671 has been isolated, cultured and identified from the cow dung microbial consortium as a high-potential phenol degrader.
Among the 71 isolates 44 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa 19 were Pseudomonas stutzeri, 8 were Pseudomonas putida 1 were Alcaligenes faecalis Out of 71/45 were from HIV population, 24 were from Non-HIV and 2 were environmental isolates.
Cloning and high-level expression of the glutathione-independent formaldehyde dehydrogenase gene from Pseudomonas putida.
Plasmid Horizontal Transfer of Naphthalene Catabolism Gene between Bacteria at a Coal Tar Contaminated Site Are Homologous to pDTG1 from Pseudomonas Putida NCIB 9816-4.