Burkholderia pseudomallei

(redirected from Pseudomallei)

Burkholderia pseudomallei

a species found in cases of melioidosis in humans and other animals and in soil and water in tropical regions. New name for Pseudomonas pseudomallei.

Burkholderia pseudomallei

a species that inhabits water and soil and causes melioidosis. Infection is spread via contact with a contaminated source and is a predominant disease of tropical climates. The species is a potential agent for bioterrorism. See also melioidosis.

Burkholderia pseudomallei

A gram-negative Pseudomonas-like bacillus found in the environment—e.g., plants, water, and soil of the tropics and subtropics—which is not part of normal human flora, but may be acquired by inhalation or direct inoculation through disrupted skin.

Clinical findings
Human disease ranges from asymptomatic to melioidosis, which is characterised by multifocal abscesses, pneumonia, septicaemia and shock. It has a 20–50% mortality rate.

Burkholderia pseudomallei

Pseudomonas pseudomallei Bacteriology A Pseudomonas-like bacterium Clinical Ranges from asymptomatic to melioidosis; skin infection and multifocal abscesses, URI, septicemia and shock

Burk·hol·der·i·a pseu·do·mal·le·i

(bŭrk-hol-der'ē-ă sū-dō-mal'ē-ī)
A bacterial species found in cases of melioidosis in humans and other animals and in soil and water in tropical regions.

Burkholderia

a genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria.

Burkholderia mallei
the causative agent of glanders, a disease of horses that is communicable to humans. Previously called Pseudomonas mallei.
Burkholderia pseudomallei
the causative agent of melioidosis, a disease of rodents occasionally transmitted to all domestic animal species and humans. Formerly called Pseudomonas pseudomallei.
References in periodicals archive ?
On May 1, 2013, the Company announced an exclusive worldwide collaboration with Intrexon to jointly develop a treatment for Melioidosis, a potentially lethal disease caused by the Gram-negative bacteria Burkholderia pseudomallei, which is endemic in Southeast Asia and Northern Australia.
pseudomallei to cause severe, rapidly fatal, invasive infections and to persist in the environment for extended periods, plus its intrinsic resistance to many antibacterial drugs, make B.
On May 1, 2013, the Company announced a worldwide collaboration with Intrexon Corporation to jointly develop a treatment for Melioidosis, a potentially lethal disease caused by the Gram-negative bacteria Burkholderia pseudomallei, which is endemic in Southeast Asia and Northern Australia.
Melioidosis is caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, a Gram-negative bacteria that is highly resistant to antibiotic treatment regimens.
Phylogenetic analyses of Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates, performed by using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) (3), have led to phylogeographic associations that can be used to track melioidosis epidemics (4).
Reported potent Restanza in vitro data in Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei, which are important biodefense and global health related pathogens and announced positive data from an in vitro study assessing Restanza against 30 strains of Burkholderia pseudomallei, further highlighting its ability to address serious bacterial infections that are becoming untreatable due to the increasing public health threat of bacterial resistance to currently marketed antibiotics;
pseudomallei count was 30 CFU/L (range <10-11,300 CFU/L).
pseudomallei as measured by minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), the lowest concentration of an antimicrobial that will inhibit the visible growth of a microorganism after 24 hours of incubation.
Melioidosis is an often fatal infectious disease caused by the soil bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei.
Similarly, Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of meliodosis, can be carried asymptomatically for extended periods before illness onset, posing a persistent exposure risk for persons working with imported nonhuman primates from regions to which meliodosis is endemic (7).
Trius will then apply its structure-based drug design and development capabilities in an effort to optimize promising antibacterial compounds for activity against gram-negative biodefense pathogens such as Yersinia pestis, Francisella tularensis and Burkholderia pseudomallei.