medical directive

(redirected from Proxy decision-maker)

medical directive

a general term for documents that provide direction on the type of care a person desires. See also advance directive, living will.
A specific and comprehensive advance care document developed for a person which addresses and tries to anticipate that person’s health care needs at the end of his life

medical directive

End-of-life decisions A specific and comprehensive advance care document–being developed for health care at the end of life. See Advance directive, Durable power of attorney, Living will.
Medical Directive–optimal components  
Introduction Provides an explanation of the document's purpose
Paradigmatic scenarios Provides examples that help the individual understand various illness circumstances and evaluate the types of life-sustaining interventions that might be employed; the PSs would–in theory–help the individual designate his/her preferences with respect to specific treatments
Proxy decision-maker Section provides details on who would make the decisions in the event of the individual becoming mentally incompetent
Organ donation Yes/no, what, to whom, for what
Personal statement The individual's 'wrap-up'
References in periodicals archive ?
If a patient cannot grant valid informed consent, then, unless their life is in imminent risk, health care providers must get consent from someone who can speak on the behalf of the patient--a surrogate decision-maker--sometimes called proxy decision-maker.
Advance directives usually document patients' wishes for life-sustaining treatment in a living will, as well as their choice of a proxy decision-maker in a durable power of attorney for health care Advance directives are sanctioned in all 50 states and can be completed for free without the aid of an attorney.
This includes documenting the person's wishes regarding medical treatments in advanced stages of dementia and designation of a proxy decision-maker.
The fact that the family previously chose not to serve as the patient's proxy decision-makers in this case is important because it may illustrate a particular family dynamic to which the treatment team is not privy.
By encouraging patient use of advance directives, such as Living Wills and designation of proxy decision-makers for health care, Wetle says that the Act "allows the extension of patient autonomy into the period in which patients can no longer communicate for themselves.
Only 30 percent of the social workers, for example, were familiar with the requirement that all residents must be contacted to discuss advanced directives and proxy decision-makers.
The desperate intensity of this search is revealed by the state laws, noted above, that denominate proxy decision-makers even where an incompetent patient has made no prior selection.