Proust

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Proust

(prūst),
T., 19th-century French physician. See: Proust space.

Proust

(prūst),
Louis J., French chemist, 1755-1826. See: Proust law.
References in periodicals archive ?
First, there is a movement in the story away from Proustian plenitude towards Beckettian 'lessness'.
The power of the Proustian metaphor, then, is not merely rhetorical; it really amounts to an 'onto-poetics.
The Democratie also made Tocqueville famous practically overnight, and Brogan duly treats us to some lavish salon-scenes that would sound positively Proustian if they included a few more nobles stabbing each other in the back.
The original competition drawing for the Pompidou is a particularly Proustian moment; a fragrant madeleine of Rotring ink on curdled tracing paper.
Instead, there's Proustian musings on time, and rich Dickensian scene-setting and characterisation.
The experience was not a sweet one and has not brought on Proustian inspirations.
Whether that formula of Proustian, "doom-eager" three sisters was inspired by the Brontes, Chekhov, or whatever, it is not a work that I ever understood and, possibly as a consequence, ever liked, even when I first saw it with a 60-year-old Graham more than a half century ago.
For me, this was almost a Proustian moment, with the now obscure acronym reviving, in my mind's eye, countless headlines, industry disputes and politicking spinning back through two decades.
You must be destroyyyyyed" was an almost Proustian flashback - like hearing Johnny Rotten trapped inside a great space dustbin.
Confronted with the culture of entertainment, can we build and nurture a culture of revolt, in the etymological and Proustian sense of the word: an unveiling, a return, a displacement, a reconstruction of the past, of memory, of meaning?
Instead of an 'extraordinary' Proustian moment of a recaptured past, Birchwood's protagonist, Gabriel Godkin comes to embrace the concept of a constantly shifting and unstable past.
This is an exaggeration, and if Marc Chagall and His Times bears any resemblance to a novel, it would be a rather Proustian one.