proton

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proton

 [pro´ton]
an elementary particle of mass number 1, with a positive charge equal to the negative charge of the electron; a constituent particle of every nucleus, the number of protons in the nucleus of each atom of a chemical element being indicated by its atomic number.

pro·ton (p),

(prō'ton),
The positively charged unit of the nuclear mass; protons form part (or in hydrogen 1 the whole) of the nucleus of the atom around which the negative electrons revolve.
[G. ntr. of prōtos, first]

proton

/pro·ton/ (pro´ton) an elementary particle that is the core or nucleus of an ordinary hydrogen atom of mass 1; the unit of positive electricity, being equivalent to the electron in charge and approximately to the hydrogen ion in mass. Symbol p.

proton

[prō′ton]
Etymology: Gk, protos, first
a positively charged particle that is a fundamental component of the nucleus of all atoms. The number of protons in the nucleus of an atom equals the atomic number of the element. Compare electron, neutron. See also atomic mass.

proton

A positively charged particle located in the nucleus of an atom of an element, the number of which governs its chemical properties.

pro·ton

(prō'ton)
The positively charged unit of the nuclear mass; protons form part (or in hydrogen 1, the whole) of the nucleus of the atom around which the negative electrons revolve.
[G. ntr. of prōtos, first]

proton

The positively-charged nucleus of a hydrogen atom. A hydrogen ion and the basis of acids.

proton,

n positively charged subatomic particle that is located in the nucleus of an atom. Its mass is equivalent to that of a neutron. The number of protons is equivalent to the atomic number.

pro·ton

(prō'ton)
The positively charged unit of the nuclear mass; protons form part (or in hydrogen 1, the whole) of the nucleus of the atom around which the negative electrons revolve.
[G. ntr. of prōtos, first]

proton (prō´ton),

n an elementary particle having a positive charge equivalent to the negative charge of the electron but possessing a mass approximately 1845 times as great; the proton is a nuclear particle, whereas the electron is extranuclear.

proton

an elementary particle of mass number 1, with a positive charge equal to the negative charge of the electron; a constituent particle of every nucleus, the number of protons in the nucleus of each atom of a chemical element being indicated by its atomic number.

proton pump
see sodium pump.
proton pump inhibitor
a class of therapeutic agents which are used to counteract the effects of proton pumps in tissues and organs, particularly used in counteracting gastric hypersecretion and acidity.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is estimated that around 10% of UK patients who currently receive conventional radiotherapy would be better treated with proton beam therapy.
Patients will then be able to receive the proton beam therapy from around the end of the year.
Overview of Real Time Image Gating System for Proton Beam Therapy Systems (RGPT)
It is not currently available in the UK, but that is set to change later this year when Rutherford Cancer Centre in Newport unveils its proton beam therapy system.
She recommended proton beam therapy which is a specialist form of radiotherapy that targets certain cancers precisely.
About 43 percent of elderly patients received 3-D conformal radiation, 36 percent of patients received intensity-modulated radiation and 21 percent of patients received proton beam therapy.
After numerous gruelling rounds of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, doctors told her proton beam therapy was needed.
Proton Beam Therapy is considered the most advanced and targeted cancer radiotherapy treatment, limiting the collateral damage of radiation to other vital organs in the body and lowering the risk of side effects.
The Reading centre will be the third to be constructed in the UK by Proton Partners and is intended to help meet increasing demand for proton beam therapy, a specialised type of cancer treatment that is not yet available in the United Kingdom.
IT'S understandable that most people diagnosed with cancer will want to ensure they're getting the best treatment available In 2014, the story of five-year-old brain tumour patient Ashya King put proton beam therapy (PBT) in the spotlight, after his parents took him out of the Southampton hospital where he was being treated, sparking an international manhunt, in a bid to get PBT for their son abroad.
Amy had part of the lump removed and her family are now saving to have proton beam treatment in America.