Protista

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Protista

 [pro-tis´tah]
in the classification of living organisms, a kingdom comprising unicellular organisms with distinct nuclei (the eukaryotes), including protozoa, algae (except blue-green “algae,” which are now classified as bacteria), and certain intermediate forms.

Pro·tis·ta

(prō-tis'tă),
A kingdom of both plantlike and animallike eucaryotic unicellular organisms, either in the form of solitary organisms, for example, protozoa, or colonies of cells lacking true tissues.
[G. ntr. pl. of prōtistos, the first of all]

Protista

/Pro·tis·ta/ (pro-tis´tah)
1. a kingdom comprising the unicellular bacteria, algae, slime molds, fungi, and protozoa; it includes all single-celled organisms.
2. a kingdom comprising unicellular organisms with distinct nuclei (the eukaryotes), including protozoa, algae, and certain intermediate forms.

Pro·tis·ta

(prō-tis'tă)
A kingdom of both plantlike and animallike eukaryotic unicellular organisms, either in the form of solitary organisms, e.g., protozoa, or colonies of cells lacking true tissues.
[G. ntr. pl. of prōtistos, the first of all]

Protista

or

Protoctista

the kingdom, in older CLASSIFICATIONS, which contains eukaryotic, mostly unicellular, organisms, including ALGAE, diatoms (BACILLARIOPHYCEAE), PROTOZOANS and slime moulds.

Protista

a kingdom comprising bacteria, algae, slime molds, fungi and protozoa; it includes all single-celled prokaryotic organisms.
References in periodicals archive ?
These living things arose in the fossil record in the following sequence: bacteria, protists, (plants, fungi, animals), and man.
Protists are important consumers in the freshwater food web (Heath et at, 2003; Marxsen, 2006), and the ciliates are key in this web as primary consumers of bacteria.
2008); and (3) the need to understand the survival and fate of pathogenic protists, viruses, and bacteria from human and animal waste streams (Gordon and Toze 2003).
html) and 100 000 species of protists have been formally described (4) The present study focuses on the biochemical and enzymatic characterization of gram negative isolates from Puri Sea water and check up their antibiotic susceptibility profile.
Spatial and seasonal variations of planktonic protists (Mastigophora, Sarcodina and Ciliophora) in a river-lacustrine system in northeast Brazil.
27) covers salt-lovers and other types of archaeans, and Rona Arato's PROTISTS (9780778753773, $29.
The text discusses the decay process and human remains, including body fluids and waste products, DNA, hair, teeth, bones, and wounds, and the range of organisms used in forensic investigations--invertebrates, vertebrates, protists, fungi, plants and microbes.
The role of amoeboid protists and the microbial community in moss-rich terrestrial ecosystems: Biogeochemical implications for the carbon budget and carbon cycle, especially at higher latitudes.
In many protists, these fibers systems have been expanded into elaborate contractile cytoskeletons with a concomitant increase in the number of centrin genes.
So, it was proposed that such sequences might also be useful for distinguishing between species of fungi, plants, algae, and protists, thus making CO1 a universal marker for DNA barcoding all earth's eukaryotic species--those organisms whose cells have a nucleus, in contrast to prokaryotes, such as bacteria, whose DNA is not concentrated in a nucleus.
Later, however, comprehensive sequence comparisons of the nucleic acids and proteins of these microorganisms showed fundamental differences to bacteria, so that evolutionary biologists reclassified the five kingdoms of life to three domains: archaea, single-celled organisms lacking nuclei; bacteria, which also lack nuclei; and eukarya, organisms with nuclei (single-celled protists, single- and multi-celled algae, single- and multi-celled fungi, plants, animals, and humans).
Prokaryotic cells, which are represented by the eubacteria and archaea, contain precious little internal compartmentalization and have transcriptionally coupled translation, whereas eukaryotic cells, which compose plants, fungi, algae, animals, and a widely diverse group of unicellular protists, are equipped with a large cadre of intracellular compartments that are functionally specialized for specific intracellular tasks.