Proteus

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Proteus

 [pro´te-us]
a genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, motile, rod-shaped bacteria. Organisms are found in fecal material, especially in patients treated with oral antibiotics. P. mira´bilis is a leading cause of urinary tract infections. P. morga´nii is found in the intestines and is associated with summer diarrhea of infants. P. vulga´ris is a common cause of cystitis and pyelonephritis and is associated with eye and ear infections, pleuritis, peritonitis, and suppurative abscesses.

Proteus

(prō'tē-ŭs),
1. A former genus of the Sarcodina, now termed Amoeba.
2. A genus of motile, peritrichous, non-spore-forming, aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) containing gram-negative rods; coccoid forms, large irregular involution forms, filaments, and spheroplasts occur under different culture conditions. The metabolism is fermentative, producing acid or acid and visible gas from glucose; lactose is not fermented, and they rapidly decompose urea and deaminate phenylalanine. Proteus occurs primarily in fecal matter and in putrefying materials. The type species is Proteus vulgaris.
[G. Proteus, a sea god, who had the power to change his form]

Proteus

/Pro·te·us/ (pro´te-us) a genus of gram-negative, motile bacteria usually found in fecal and other putrefying matter, including P. morga´nii, found in the intestines and associated with summer diarrhea of infants, and P. vulga´ris, often found as a secondary invader in various localized suppurative pathologic processes; it is a cause of cystitis.

proteus

(prō′tē-əs)
n. pl. pro·tei (-tē-ī′)
Any of various gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria of the genus Proteus, certain species of which are associated with human enteritis and urinary tract infections.

Proteus

[prō′tē·əs]
Etymology: Gk, Proteus, mythic god who changed shapes
a genus of motile, gram-negative bacilli often associated with nosocomial infections, normally found in feces, water, and soil. Proteus may cause urinary tract infections, pyelonephritis, wound infections, diarrhea, bacteremia, and endotoxic shock. Some species are sensitive to penicillin; most respond to the aminoglycoside antibiotics and cephalosporins.

Pro·te·us

(prō'tē-ŭs)
A genus of motile, peritrichous, non-spore-forming, aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria containing gram-negative rods. The metabolism is fermentative, producing acid. Proteus occurs primarily in fecal matter and in putrefying materials.
[G. Proteus, a sea god, who had the power to change his form]

Proteus

A genus of GRAM NEGATIVE, rod-shaped bacteria that frequently cause urinary infections or ENTERITIS. A common species is Proteus vulgaris .

Pro·te·us

(prō'tē-ŭs)
A genus of motile, peritrichous, non-spore-forming, aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria found primarily in fecal matter and in putrefying materials.
[G. Proteus, a sea god, who had the power to change his form]

Proteus

a genus of gram-negative, motile bacteria, members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, usually found in fecal and other putrefying matter. Also found associated with infections of the external ear and skin and in pyometra and pyelonephritis.

Proteus mirabilis
a common inhabitant of animal fecal material found particularly in infections of the eye, skin, urinary and respiratory tract.
Proteus vulgaris
found in canine epididymo-orchitis, prostatitis and cystitis.