protein targeting

(redirected from Protein localization)

protein targeting

Any mechanism by which proteins that have been manufactured by cells are distributed to specific cellular membranes or organelles.
References in periodicals archive ?
GNAQ protein localization in the testis and epididymis was determined by immunohistochemistry.
sup][12] Disorder mutations could impair nucleoside transport, protein localization, and stability of hENT3.
Proteins extracted by Minute[TM] kits can be used in applications such as SDS-PAGE, immunoblottings, ELISA, IP, protein localization, gel mobility shift assays, and more.
These include molecular biology methods for antigen production by protein expression in bacterial cells, for epitope tagged protein expression in plant and animal cells allowing protein localization in the absence of protein specific antibodies, and for the production of anti-peptide, monoclonal, and polyclonal antibodies.
Green fluorescent protein-a bright idea for the study of bacterial protein localization.
When the target gene is expressed, GFP lights up (fluoresces), creating a visual marker of gene expression and protein localization, via light (optical) microscopy.
We describe a bioinformatics and data mining method for evaluating diagnostic serum biomarker candidates by selecting genes and gene products that possess intrinsic protein localization and tissue expression properties.
The database combines proprietary immunohistochemistry data, obtained by using specific antibodies to determine protein localization in normal and diseased human tissues, with manually curated data covering more than 2,000 human genes from eight gene families.
Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated p53 protein localization in cell nuclei of both tumors, as well as in the adjacent normal-appearing adrenal cortical cell nuclei.
They all share small conserved domains named polo-box required fort protein localization.
LifeSpan's DrugTarget Database is the industry's largest resource for proprietary human protein localization data for drug targets in eight important gene families, including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs), kinases, ion channels, phosphatases, proteases, phosphodiesterases, and transporters.
The Phase II project funded by the NSF will enable integration of data and information on protein localization, molecular trafficking, and the relevant cellular machineries with Cognia's existing content.