ligand

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ligand

 [li´gand, lig´and]
an organic molecule that donates the necessary electrons to form coordinate covalent bonds with metallic ions. Also, an ion or molecule that reacts to form a complex with another molecule.

lig·and

(lig'and, lī'gand),
1. Any individual atom, group, or molecule attached to a central metal ion by multiple coordinate bonds, for example, the porphyrin portion of heme, the corrin nucleus of the B12 vitamins.
2. An organic molecule attached to a tracer element, for example, a radioisotope.
3. A molecule that binds to a macromolecule, for example, a ligand binding to a receptor.
4. The analyte in competitive binding assays, such as radioimmunoassay.
5. An atom or group covalently attached to a specified carbon atom in an organic molecule.
[L. ligo, to bind]

ligand

/li·gand/ (li´gand) (lig´and) an organic molecule that donates the necessary electrons to form coordinate covalent bonds with metallic ions. Also, an ion or molecule that reacts to form a complex with another molecule.

ligand

(lī′gənd, lĭg′ənd)
n.
An ion, molecule, or molecular group that binds to another chemical entity to form a larger complex.

ligand

[lig′ənd, lī′gənd]
Etymology: L, ligare, to bind
1 a molecule, ion, or group bound to the central metal atom of a chemical compound, such as the oxygen molecule in oxyhemoglobin, which is bound to the central iron atom.
2 an organic molecule attached to a specific site on a cell surface or to a tracer element. The binding is reversible in a competitive binding assay. It may be the analyte or a cross-reactant. Examples include vitamin B12, a ligand with intrinsic factor as the binding protein, and various antigens, which are ligands with antibody-binding proteins.

li·gand

(lī'gand)
1. An organic molecule attached to a central metal ion by multiple coordinate bonds.
2. An organic molecule attached to a tracer element, e.g., a radioisotope.
3. A molecule that binds to a macromolecule, e.g., a ligand binding to a receptor.
4. The analyte in competitive binding assays, such as radioimmunoassay.
[L. ligo, to bind]

ligand

A MOLECULE or ION that binds to a central chemical entity by non-covalent bonds. A general term for any molecule that is recognized by a surface receptor.

ligand

a molecule able to bind to a specific ANTIBODY and used to distinguish closely similar types of antibody.

li·gand

(lī'gand)
1. Any individual atom, group, or molecule attached to a central metal ion by multiple coordinate bonds.
2. An organic molecule attached to a tracer element.
3. A molecule that binds to a macromolecule.
[L. ligo, to bind]

ligand

(līgənd),
n 1. a molecule, ion, or group bound to the central atom of a chemical compound, such as the oxygen molecule in hemoglobin, which is bound to the central iron atom.
2. an organic molecule attached to a specific site on a surface or to a tracer element.

ligand

an organic molecule that donates the necessary electrons to form coordinate covalent bonds with metallic ions. Also, an ion or part of a molecule that specifically binds to form a complex with another molecule.
References in periodicals archive ?
They consider the innate immune system in mammals and insects, microbial protein ligands, antimicrobial peptides, complement, antibacterial chemokines, the role of neutrophils and monocytes, functions of the airway epithelium, oxidative innate immune defenses, and the effect of aging on innate immunity.
a survey of techniques that will be integral to the discovery of new small molecule protein surface binders, from high throughput synthesis and screening techniques to in silico and in vitro methods for the discovery of novel protein ligands.
European and US scientists mostly in materials science or pharmaceuticals provide an overview of an approach to designing drugs that involves fitting together existing fragments of protein ligands.
TSCP molecules, with their two active sites, represent a new class of drugs and if successful, the third generation of biological drugs, following protein ligands and antibodies.