prostratin


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prostratin

A non-tumor-promoting phorbol ester derived from the bark of the mamala tree (Homalanthus nutans ). It is capable of blocking the spread of HIV and of reactivating HIV expression from latency in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, thus exposing HIV particles to antiviral drug therapy. Prostratin offers the possibility of eliminating persistent viral reservoirs in certain individuals infected with HIV.
References in periodicals archive ?
2011) De novo assembly of Euphorbia fischeriana root transcriptome identifies prostratin pathway related genes.
Its current research targeting latent HIV reservoirs, including the development of prostratin, will bring the world closer to a cure.
The bark was analysed by The US National Cancer Institute and prostratin was identified as a key ingredient and after 25 years of dedicated work, Wender has been able to synthesise prostratin, enabling the latest breakthrough.
Drugs such as histone deacetylase inhibitors, currently used and licensed for the treatment of some cancers; methylation inhibitors; cytokines such as IL-7 or activators of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-[kappa]B) such as prostratin, show promising activity in reversing latency in vitro when used either alone or in combination.
based research institutions for shares of royalties from the use of prostratin, an antiviral chemical derived from the bark of the native mamala tree (Homalanthusnutans).
Other candidates include IL-7 and kinase agonists such as prostratin.
Amyris also plans to adapt the terpene precursor pathway to make prostratin, an anti-HIV compound found in the bark of a Samoan tree.
agreed to sponsor the first two rounds of clinical trials of prostratin.
Ultimately this discovery led to a promising anti-HIV compound called Prostratin, isolated by a team at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in 1989 and patented as an antiviral remedy.
NCI solicited bids from pharmaceutical companies to license prostratin for the development of a potential new AIDS drug.
Although no pharmaceutical company has yet picked up prostratin for clinical testing, Cox and Cragg both point out that part of any income derived from future sale of the product will be returned to Samoa.
In August 2004, Keasling traveled to Samoa with ethnobotanist Paul Alan Cox to sign an agreement that gives a share of any profits from the production of Prostratin directly to the Samoans, since they first discovered and used the drug.