Propionibacterium


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Propionibacterium

 [pro″pe-on″ĭ-bak-te´re-um]
a genus of gram-positive, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria, found as saprophytes in humans, animals, and dairy products. P. ac´nes (also known as Corynebacterium acnes) is a normal skin inhabitant and can cause chronic infections of the blood and bone marrow. P. granulo´sum (also known as Corynebacterium granulosum) causes abscesses.

Propionibacterium

(prō'pē-on'ē-bak-tē'rē-ŭm), Avoid the misspellings Propionobacterium and Proprionibacterium.
A genus of nonmotile, non-spore-forming, anaerobic to aerotolerant bacteria (family Propionibacteriaceae) containing gram-positive rods that are usually pleomorphic, diphtheroid, or club shaped, with one end rounded, the other tapered or pointed. Some cells may be coccoid, elongate, bifid, or even branched. The cells usually occur singly, in pairs, in V and Y configurations, short chains, or clumps in "Chinese character" arrangement. The metabolism of these organisms is fermentative, and the products of fermentation include combinations of propionic and acetic acids. These organisms occur in dairy products, on human skin, and in the intestinal tracts of humans and other animals. They may be pathogenic. The type species is Propionibacterium freudenreichii.

Propionibacterium

/Pro·pi·on·i·bac·te·ri·um/ (pro″pe-on″e-bak-tēr´e-um) a genus of gram-positive bacteria found as saprophytes in humans, animals, and dairy products.

Propionibacterium

[prō′pē·on′ēbaktir′ē·əm]
Etymology: Gk, pro + pion, fat, bakterion, small rod
a genus of nonmotile, anaerobic, gram-positive bacteria found on the skin of humans, in the intestinal tract of humans and animals, and in dairy products. Propionibacterium acnes is common in acne pustules. Formerly called Corynebacterium acnes.

Pro·pi·on·i·bac·te·ri·um

(prō'pē-on-i-bak-tēr'ē-ŭm)
A genus of nonmotile, non-spore-forming, anaerobic to aerotolerant bacteria containing gram-positive rods that are usually pleomorphic, diphtheroid, or club-shaped, with one end rounded, the other tapered or pointed. The cells usually occur singly, in pairs, in V and Y configurations, short chains, or clumps. These organisms occur in dairy products, on human skin, and in the intestinal tracts of humans and other animals. They may be pathogenic. The type species is P. freudenreichii.

Propionibacterium

gram-positive pleomorphic rods which are common skin residents, found also in dairy products and the alimentary tract.

Propionibacterium acnes
activates macrophages, increases proliferation of lymphoblasts, and stimulates resistance to bacterial infection. Used as a bacterial immunostimulant.
References in periodicals archive ?
Staphylococcus epidermidis in the human skin midcrobiome mediates fermentation to inhibit the grown of Propionibacterium acnes: Implications of probiotics in acne vulgaris.
Bacteroides, Propionibacterium, Clostridium, Eubacterium, and Streptococcus metabolize glycine, alanine, threonine, glutamate, lysine and aspartate to acetic acid.
The most common organisms in the hospital sepsis cohort Organism n Escherichia coli 3 Alpha streptococci 3 Beta hemolytic streptococci 3 Staphylococcus aureus 2 Coagulase-negative staphylococci 2 Bacteroides fragilis 1 Proteus mirabilis 1 Klebsiella pneumoniae 1 Streptococcus pneumoniae 1 Enterococcus faecalis 1 Propionibacterium acnes 1 Capnocytophaga canimorsus 1
These samples were 2 Hurley stage 1 samples yielding pure culture of Propionibacterium acnes and 2 samples yielding corynebacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, and coagulase negative staphylococci.
2012 reported the biofilm inhibitory activity of the same against Propionibacterium acnes.
Patients with a recent history of systemic or topical clindamycin or erythromycin use are more likely to have pre-existing and anti-microbial resistant Propionibacterium acnes and commensal flora.
The scientists looked at a tiny microbe with a big name: Propionibacterium acnes, bacteria that thrive in the oily depths of our pores.
It is caused by an association of four key factors: increased sebum production, follicular hyperkeratinization, colonization with the bacteria Propionibacterium acnes and production of inflammation.
Up to 60% of strains of Propionibacterium acnes, the bacterium that causes acne, are antibiotic-resistant, and improved acne therapies are needed.
According to the results of the study conducted jointly at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and the University of Pittsburgh, the harmless virus known as bacteriophages (phage) -- that unlike viruses such as HIV or poliovirus feed only on bacteria and not on human cells-can target bacteria responsible for Propionibacterium acnes, Press TV reported.