prophylactic

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prophylactic

 [pro″fĭ-lak´tik]
1. pertaining to prophylaxis.
2. tending to ward off disease.
3. an agent that so acts.
4. condom.

pro·phy·lac·tic

(prō'fi-lak'tik),
1. Preventing disease; relating to prophylaxis. Synonym(s): preventive
2. An agent that acts to prevent a disease.
[G. prophylaktikos; see prophylaxis]

prophylactic

/pro·phy·lac·tic/ (pro″-fĭ-lak´tik)
1. tending to ward off disease; pertaining to prophylaxis.
2. an agent that tends to ward off disease.

prophylactic

(prō′fə-lăk′tĭk, prŏf′ə-)
adj.
Acting to defend against or prevent something, especially disease; protective.
n.
1. A prophylactic agent, device, or measure, such as a vaccine or drug.
2. A contraceptive device, especially a condom.

pro′phy·lac′ti·cal·ly adv.

prophylactic

[prō′filak′tik]
Etymology: Gk, prophylax, advance guard
1 adj, preventing the spread of disease.
2 n, an agent that prevents the spread of disease.
3 n, a popular name for condom. -prophylactically, adv.

prophylactic

adjective Referring to a preventive manoeuvre.

noun An older term for condom.

prophylactic

Medtalk adjective Preventive, protective noun A drug, vaccine, regimen, or device designed to prevent or protect against a given disorder Vox populi Condom, see there.

pro·phy·lac·tic

(prō'fi-lak'tik)
1. Preventing disease; relating to prophylaxis.
Synonym(s): preventive.
2. An agent that acts to prevent a disease.
3. Colloq. used to mean condom, and to a lesser extent, a method of birth control.

prophylactic

And any act, procedure, drug or equipment used to guard against or prevent an unwanted outcome, such as a disease.

Prophylactic

Guarding from or preventing the spread or occurrence of disease or infection.

prophylactic,

adj serving to prevent or defend against disease.

prophylactic,

n 1. intervention that prevents or defends against disease.
2. a condom.

prophylactic 

1. Preventing disease. 2. An agent or a remedy that either prevents the development of a disease or prevents the worsening of a disease process.

pro·phy·lac·tic

(prō'fi-lak'tik)
1. Preventing disease; relating to prophylaxis.
Synonym(s): preventive.
2. Agent that acts to prevent disease. e.g., a condom
[G. prophylaktikos; see etymology of prophylaxis]

prophylactic (prō´filak´tik),

adj preventing disease; relating to prophylaxis.

prophylactic

1. tending to ward off disease; pertaining to prophylaxis.
2. an agent that tends to ward off disease.

prophylactic antibiotic therapy
treatment with antibiotics, beginning just before a surgical procedure, to minimize or prevent development of infection. See also perioperative.
prophylactic vaccination
vaccination carried out in expectation of the occurrence of the disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because they must, for the sake of judicial legitimacy, be read as broad norms rather than as precise requirements, a wider spectrum of prophylactic rules is available.
Campbell represents a rare case where the written constitution ostensibly offered no protection for an implied constitutional rule, and the Supreme Court majority accordingly found it necessary to create a prophylactic rule that would offer the necessary safeguards.
Campbell nicely illustrates how judicial use of the idea of prophylactic rules might have rescued the courts and Parliament from politically charged confrontations.
Had the Court recognized prophylactic rules, it would have regarded itself as bound either to justify its claim that the strategy generated in Campbell is dictated by the terms of the constitution (knowing that its reasons would undergo scrutiny and possible challenge at a later date), or to concede that the strategy is strictly prophylactic.
The Court's judgment in Prosper (57) likewise makes sense only when one distinguishes between constitutional rules and prophylactic rules.
Prosper provides a clue as to how recognition of prophylactic rules can untie the hands of legislatures.
One might be tempted to reduce this paper to a simple (and somewhat trendy) appeal for "dialogue" between the courts and legislatures: courts should recognize, in their writings, the difference between constitutional rules and prophylactic rules, because in doing so they clarify the ways in which legislatures can contribute to the branches' combined understanding of what the constitution demands.
But when the Court muddies the distinction between constitutional rules and prophylactic rules, no one can blame a legislature for crafting laws that seem to fly in the face of a court ruling.
Should the courts uphold the new rule because the old rule was merely prophylactic (though, again, not identified as such), they seriously undermine their own status in the constitutional order.
72) This permits one to imagine a judiciary that invites the legislature to question its constitutional interpretations and, at the same time, a legislature that trusts--indeed, relies on--the judiciary to craft prophylactic rules unless and until the legislature decides a different strategy is needed.
Strauss, "The Ubiquity of Prophylactic Rules" (1988) 55 U.
Landsberg, "Safeguarding Constitutional Rights: The Uses and Limits of Prophylactic Rules" (1999) 66 Tenn.