prokaryote

(redirected from Prokaryotes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Prokaryotes: archaea, Archæa

prokaryote

 [pro-kar´e-ōt]
any member of the kingdom Monera; a unicellular organism lacking a true nucleus and nuclear membrane, having genetic material composed of a single loop of naked double-stranded DNA. The microorganisms, comprising the bacteria and blue-green bacteria (formerly blue-green algae), are predominantly unicellular but may have filamentous, mycelial, or colonial forms. Prokaryotes, with the exception of genus Mycoplasma, have a rigid cell wall. adj., adj prokaryot´ic.

pro·kar·y·ote

(prō-kar'ē-ōt),
A member of the superkingdom Prokaryotae; an organismic unit consisting of a single and presumably primitive moneran cell, or a precellular organism, which lacks a nuclear membrane, paired organized chromosomes, a mitotic mechanism for cell division, microtubules, and mitochondria.
See also: Prokaryotae, Monera, eukaryote.
Synonym(s): procaryote

prokaryote

/pro·kary·ote/ (-kar´e-ōt) a unicellular organism lacking a true nucleus and nuclear membrane, having genetic material composed of a single loop of naked double-stranded DNA. Prokaryotes, with the exception of mycoplasmas, have a rigid cell wall.prokaryot´ic

prokaryote

also

procaryote

(prō-kăr′ē-ōt′)
n.
Any of various microorganisms of the domains Archaea and Bacteria, characterized by the absence of a distinct membrane-bound nucleus and membrane-bound organelles and by the simultaneous occurrence of DNA transcription and protein synthesis at the same site, in contrast to eukaryotes. Also called moneran.

pro·kar′y·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk) adj.

prokaryote

[prōker′ē·ōt]
Etymology: Gk, protos + karyon
a unicellular organism that does not contain a true nucleus surrounded by a double membrane; a bacterium. Division usually occurs through simple fission. Also spelled procaryote. Compare eukaryote. -prokaryotic, adj.

pro·kar·y·ote

(prō-kar'ē-ōt)
A member of the superkingdom Prokaryotae; an organism consisting of a single cell, or a precellular organism, which lacks a nuclear membrane, paired organized chromosomes, a mitotic mechanism for cell division, microtubules, and mitochondria.
See also: eukaryote
Synonym(s): procaryote.

prokaryote

or

prokaryote

any organism, including those in the domains BACTERIA or ARCHAEA, that lacks a membrane-bound nucleus and has no MITOSIS or MEIOSIS. Organelles such as the MITOCHONDRION and the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM are also lacking. Compare EUKARYOTE and See Fig. 155 .

prokaryote

a unicellular organism lacking a true nucleus and nuclear membrane, having genetic material composed of a single molecule of double-stranded DNA. Prokaryotes with the exception of mycoplasmas have a rigid cell wall. Includes the blue-green algae and bacteria—the Cyanophyceae.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the notion that virtually all prokaryotes are capable of communication for enhanced survival is a truly revolutionary concept in our understanding of infectious disease.
However, almost everything we know about reef microbial communities is confined to prokaryotes and viruses: next to nothing is known about the microbial eukaryotes, with the exception of the symbiont dinoflagellate Symbiodinium.
The topics include the impact of microbial natural products on antibacterial drug discovery, the membrane as a novel target site for antibiotics to kill persisting bacterial pathogens, recent developments in inhibitors of bacterial type IIA topoisomerases, antibiotics targeting translation initiation in prokaryotes, and selected structural aspects of antibiotics at the ribosomal exit tunnel.
The fossil record indicates that eukaryotes - single-celled and multicellular organisms with more complex cellular structures compared to prokaryotes, such as bacteria - show limited morphological and functional diversity before 800-600 million years ago.
Why did symbiotic relationships between prokaryotes become a permanent enslavement, resulting in the eukaryotic cell?
The origin of viruses, prokaryotes, eukaryotes, primates and humans from the initial isoprenoid organism derived actinidic archaea is postulated.
Each of these 3 SFGR is among species long accepted by International Committee of Systematics of Prokaryotes, and this status is consistent with their long evolutionary divergence and differences in their vectors and geographic distributions.
CgtA is a highly conserved essential GTP-binding protein, coded by the cgtA gene, belonging to Obg subfamily in prokaryotes (8).
They discuss a historical overview of concepts about phylogeny of microorganisms, multi-locus sequence analysis and bacterial species phylogeny estimation, the phyla of cultured and uncultured prokaryotes, applications of conserved indels for understanding microbial phylogeny, horizontal gene transfer and the formation of groups of microorganisms, endosymbiosis and the evolution of plastids, and other topics.
Among extrinsic constraints, the law of diffusion governs the relation between body volume and surface area across prokaryotes as well as unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes.
Prokaryotes are unicellular organisms, including bacteria and archaea, that don't encase their DNA in a nucleus and do not contain membrane-bound organelles.
PQuad provides three key levels of detail necessary for the analysis of peptides and proteins from prokaryotes (Figure 3).