prokaryote

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Related to Prokaryotes: archaea, Archæa

prokaryote

 [pro-kar´e-ōt]
any member of the kingdom Monera; a unicellular organism lacking a true nucleus and nuclear membrane, having genetic material composed of a single loop of naked double-stranded DNA. The microorganisms, comprising the bacteria and blue-green bacteria (formerly blue-green algae), are predominantly unicellular but may have filamentous, mycelial, or colonial forms. Prokaryotes, with the exception of genus Mycoplasma, have a rigid cell wall. adj., adj prokaryot´ic.

pro·kar·y·ote

(prō-kar'ē-ōt),
A member of the superkingdom Prokaryotae; an organismic unit consisting of a single and presumably primitive moneran cell, or a precellular organism, which lacks a nuclear membrane, paired organized chromosomes, a mitotic mechanism for cell division, microtubules, and mitochondria.
See also: Prokaryotae, Monera, eukaryote.
Synonym(s): procaryote

prokaryote

/pro·kary·ote/ (-kar´e-ōt) a unicellular organism lacking a true nucleus and nuclear membrane, having genetic material composed of a single loop of naked double-stranded DNA. Prokaryotes, with the exception of mycoplasmas, have a rigid cell wall.prokaryot´ic

prokaryote

also

procaryote

(prō-kăr′ē-ōt′)
n.
Any of various microorganisms of the domains Archaea and Bacteria, characterized by the absence of a distinct membrane-bound nucleus and membrane-bound organelles and by the simultaneous occurrence of DNA transcription and protein synthesis at the same site, in contrast to eukaryotes. Also called moneran.

pro·kar′y·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk) adj.

prokaryote

[prōker′ē·ōt]
Etymology: Gk, protos + karyon
a unicellular organism that does not contain a true nucleus surrounded by a double membrane; a bacterium. Division usually occurs through simple fission. Also spelled procaryote. Compare eukaryote. -prokaryotic, adj.

pro·kar·y·ote

(prō-kar'ē-ōt)
A member of the superkingdom Prokaryotae; an organism consisting of a single cell, or a precellular organism, which lacks a nuclear membrane, paired organized chromosomes, a mitotic mechanism for cell division, microtubules, and mitochondria.
See also: eukaryote
Synonym(s): procaryote.

prokaryote

or

prokaryote

any organism, including those in the domains BACTERIA or ARCHAEA, that lacks a membrane-bound nucleus and has no MITOSIS or MEIOSIS. Organelles such as the MITOCHONDRION and the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM are also lacking. Compare EUKARYOTE and See Fig. 155 .

prokaryote

a unicellular organism lacking a true nucleus and nuclear membrane, having genetic material composed of a single molecule of double-stranded DNA. Prokaryotes with the exception of mycoplasmas have a rigid cell wall. Includes the blue-green algae and bacteria—the Cyanophyceae.
References in periodicals archive ?
1]) since September to November 2004 and April 2005, the entrance of allochthonous substrates by run-off or river discharges might stimulate the induction of lytic cycle in lysogenic prokaryotes or favor the exportation of certain allochthonous populations from land (e.
Further, 16S rRNA gene sequencing is one of the basic genetic markers for the characterization of prokaryote microorganism community and estimates the phylogenetic richness and classification used in the quantification and taxonomy of the microbiome including non-cultivable microorganisms (Makkar & Cameotra, 2002).
according to the Rules of Bacteriological Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes, the description of species, Lysinibacillus pakistanensis sp.
Brinkman, "IslandPath: aiding detection of genomic islands in prokaryotes," Bioinformatics, vol.
Initial efforts of the application of ChlPchip to prokaryotes have been made for identification of the localization on the E.
The marker typically examined for prokaryotes (single-celled organisms) is the gene for the 16s ribosomal RNA (16s rRNA), which is considered to be unique for every known species.
The origin of viruses, prokaryotes, eukaryotes, primates and humans from the initial isoprenoid organism derived actinidic archaea is postulated.
The ease with which bacteria have become resistant to a class of synthetic antibacterials is an example of the versatility of the prokaryotes.
Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has widespread use as a qualitative reporter of in vivo gene expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes (Misteli and Spector.
Related topics discussed include the role of water in the transition from proto-cells to prokaryotes, techniques used in the search for life-conducive water on Mars and Europa, and college education in the field.
Among extrinsic constraints, the law of diffusion governs the relation between body volume and surface area across prokaryotes as well as unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes.