Projective tests


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Related to Projective tests: Thematic Apperception Test, Objective Tests

Projective tests

Psychological tests that probe into personality by obtaining open-ended responses to such materials as pictures or stories. Projective tests are often used to evaluate patients with personality disorders.
Mentioned in: Personality Disorders
References in periodicals archive ?
Nevertheless, Skinner (1936, 1953/2003) still listed the advantages of such an instrument, considering that projective tests create a laboratory situation, enabling control over stimuli in the observation of behaviour and facilitating the emergence of behaviours that are not known by the subject, especially the verbal ones.
Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, California, Tennessee, and Texas) do not allow counselors to use projective tests (California Association for Licensed Professional Clinical Counselors, n.
2001), and some state licensure boards have defined competency as compatible only with psychology licensure (Association of Test Publishers, 2007; Watson & Sheperis, 2010) while other states do not allow counselors to use projective tests (e.
One of the most striking characteristic of this projective test is drawing a human figure that is nearly universal form of drawing.
25) We believe that there is a need in South Africa for more and valid tests of psychological constructs other than intelligence, such as personality inventories, projective tests and self-report measures of emotional variables such as anxiety, anger, etc.
His Child Dissociative Checklist (CDC) score by the mother was 28, which signifies significant dissociative psychopathology (maximum score is 40) (13) His Rorschach projective test revealed difficulties in adjusting to a new environment; excessive somatic ruminations; vigorous anxiety in relation to his mother and to reality.
Within school psychology, personality tests and projective tests have been noted to be "extremely" helpful in identifying emotional disorders (Knauss, 2001).
Cartoons and stick figures are useless when analyzing drawings as projective tests and are hypothesized to be an avoidance technique by not becoming personally involved with the examiner (Kopptiz, 1968).
Limitations of projective tests include the extensive training required for their proper administration, scoring, and interpretation; demands on the clinician's time in administering and scoring them; controversies in scoring methods; variability in interpretation among clinicians; validity of psychoanalytic theory; lack of validity scales; susceptibility to coaching and malingering (particularly with presence of the Internet); and inability to assess cognitive deficits.
Also, instructions are provided for authors who wish to retain copyright to a new test or questionnaire, while caution is still advised for use of commercial intelligence or projective tests.
On their projective tests, as in their relations with their children, some continued to be "fixed more on a sibling level than on a maternal level.
For example, it is elementary that psychological tests tend to be grouped into categories called objective and projective tests.