projective test

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projective test

 
any of various tests in which an individual interprets ambiguous stimulus situations, e.g., a series of inkblots (Rorschach t.), according to his own unconscious dispositions, thus yielding information about his personality structure, its underlying dynamics, and possible psychopathology.

pro·jec·tive test

a loosely structured psychological test containing many ambiguous stimuli that require the subject to reveal feelings, personality, or psychopathology in response to them; for example, Rorschach test, thematic apperception test.

projective test

n.
A psychological test in which a subject's responses to ambiguous or unstructured standard stimuli, such as a series of cartoons, abstract patterns, or incomplete sentences, are analyzed in order to determine underlying personality traits, feelings, or attitudes.

projective test

[-jek′tiv]
Etymology: L, projectio, thrown forward
a kind of diagnostic, psychological, or personality test that uses unstructured or ambiguous stimuli, such as inkblots, a series of pictures, abstract patterns, or incomplete sentences, to elicit responses that reflect a projection of various aspects of the individual's personality. See also Rorschach test.

projective test

Projection test Psychology A psychologic tests in which a person is presented with unstructured external stimuli–eg, Rorschach inkblots, thematic apperception test, that are ambiguous and subject to subjective interpretation; analysis of responses to the situations or images in a PT provides–in theory, information on unconscious desires, personality traits, interpersonal dynamics. See Psychological testing, Rorschach test.

pro·jec·tive test

(prŏ-jektiv test)
Loosely structured psychological assessment containing ambiguous stimuli that require the patient to reveal feelings, personality, or psychopathology in response.

Projective test

A type of psychological test that assesses a person's thinking patterns, observational ability, feelings, and attitudes on the basis of responses to ambiguous test materials. It is not intended to diagnose psychiatric disorders.
References in periodicals archive ?
Projective techniques and dream work are interventions that allow release of thoughts and feelings in verbal and nonverbal ways.
These projective techniques are especially effective in enhancing the intensity of one's experience if the person first utilizes preliminary awareness continuum work.
Projective techniques have been a common tool used in consumer research over recent years.
The premise of this book is not new, since Freud identified projective techniques as "a process of ascribing one's own drives, feelings and sentiments to other people or to the outside world" in 1896.
The brand promise must be executed, leveraging the brand and leveraging that particular advantage using projective techniques to perfect the rapport with all audiences.
Her most significant work was a paper delivered in 1956 to the American Psychological Association in Chicago and published the next year as ``The Adjustment of the Male Overt Homosexual'' in The Journal of Projective Techniques.
The metaphoric techniques of Heimlich (1983) and the projective techniques of Crocker (1955) serve as a means of revealing inner fantasies, fears, illogical or disassociated thinking and egocentricity.