implicit association test

(redirected from Project Implicit)

implicit association test

A test used to assess the attitudes or biases of the subject toward particular words or ideas. The examiner presents the subject with two words (e.g., the names of two different medical treatments) and two concepts (e.g., “safe” and “hazardous”). The subject is asked to choose which of the concepts best matches the offered words.
References in periodicals archive ?
Training is unlikely to be effective without buy-in from leadership, said Carlee Beth Hawkins, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Illinois--Springfield, and a researcher with Project Implicit, a virtual laboratory focused on unconscious bias.
Images of six Black faces (three male, three female) and six White faces (three male, three female) and lists of positive and negative words were downloaded from Project Implicit, a virtual online laboratory.
A powerful exercise directors can include in staff training is Project Implicit (see sidebar and visit https://implicit .
Participation in this aspect of the project, which encompassed completing the Sexuality Implicit Association Test (IAT), required each participant to click on that icon within the Project Implicit website.
The test is available at Project Implicit, https://implicit.
The Implicit Association Test (IAT) tool, developed by Harvard as part of Project Implicit, explores thoughts and feelings outside of conscious awareness to help individuals identify and address any unconscious bias.
Hoy en dia, Project Implicit se ha expandido a mas de 30 paises, incluyendo Espana, para estudiar la prevalencia de las actitudes implicitas de las personas a traves de las culturas.
71) To better understand the general logic of the IAT procedure, see PROJECT IMPLICIT, https://implicit.
Project Implicit, a collaborative research venture between Harvard University, the University of Virginia, and the University of Washington, has tested 6 million participants over a decade.
In one study, a random sample of more than 1800 volunteers participated on the Project Implicit website, where they read a mock newspaper article comparing two competing welfare proposals.
Full browser ?