primary progressive aphasia

(redirected from Progressive aphasia)

primary progressive aphasia

a speech disorder seen with certain degenerative brain diseases, consisting of deterioration of speech and language ability over a period of years without significant loss of memory or ability to understand language.

primary progressive aphasia

A subtype of frontotemporal lobar degeneration characterised by reduced speech production, speech errors, and word retrieval difficulties resulting in mutism and an inability to communicate; memory is relatively preserved, at least in the early stages of disease.

pri·mar·y pro·gres·sive a·pha·si·a

(PPA) (prī'mar-ē prŏ-gres'iv ă-fāz'ē-ă)
A degenerative disorder of which the early major symptom is an aphasia that increases in severity and (usually) eventually includes dementia.

primary progressive aphasia

An atypical form of DEMENTIA featuring progressive loss of the language function without severe memory loss, loss of visual and spacial skills or deterioration in behaviour. The defect is essentially one of word comprehension so that there is inexorable loss of the ability to find an appropriate word or name objects (anomia) or to employ normal syntax. The condition is associated with focal degeneration in the speech areas on the left temporal lobe of the brain, but it is not considered to be a subset of Alzheimer's disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
The partnership highlights Williams-Paisley's experiences coping with her mother's battle with primary progressive aphasia, a form a dementia with no treatment or cure.
It broke down this way: Around 8 percent of those with Alzheimer's disease, 20 percent of those with Huntington's disease and 27 percent of those with a type of progressive aphasia had run-ins with the law.
Vasectomy also has been implicated as a risk factor for primary progressive aphasia, a dementia syndrome.
If you're between 40 and 65 and can't name them readily, a physician might raise concerns about primary progressive aphasia, a form of dementia that most often sets in in midlife and disrupts a person's ability to name objects and people, but leaves other cognitive skills intact.
The group consisted of 49 patients seen at the memory and aging center: 14 with early-onset dementia, 18 with primary progressive aphasia, and 17 with posterior cortical atrophy.
For the study, 30 people with primary progressive aphasia, a type of early onset dementia that mainly affects language, and 27 people without dementia, all an average age of 62, were given a test.
10) Frontotemporal dementia can be separated into 2 broad categories: behavioral variant FTD and primary progressive aphasia.
One suspects that a thorough evaluation and treatment of his neurological condition by today's methods would have been unable to arrest Ravel's progressive aphasia, but ii.
Gorno-Tempini ML, Hillis AE, Weintraub S, Kertesz A, Mendez M, Cappa SF Ogar JM, Rohrer JD, Black S, Boeve BF, Manes F, Dronkers NF, Vandenberghe R, Rascovsky K, Patterson K, Miller BL, Knopman DS, Hodges JR, Mesulam MM, Grossman M Classification of primary progressive aphasia and its variants.
Cress and King (1999) reported improvements in communication skills for two individuals with primary progressive aphasia following facilitator-trained use of picture communication boards.
2) Frontotemporal lobar degeneration is a broad diagnostic term that encompasses multiple distinct forms of a dementia syndrome, with the three major subtypes being frontotemporal dementia, semantic dementia (concept based memory loss), and primary progressive aphasia.
Pick Complex: An integrative approach to frontotemporal dementia: Primary progressive aphasia, corticobasal degeneration, and progressive supranuclear palsy.

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