primary progressive aphasia

(redirected from Progressive aphasia)

primary progressive aphasia

a speech disorder seen with certain degenerative brain diseases, consisting of deterioration of speech and language ability over a period of years without significant loss of memory or ability to understand language.

primary progressive aphasia

A subtype of frontotemporal lobar degeneration characterised by reduced speech production, speech errors, and word retrieval difficulties resulting in mutism and an inability to communicate; memory is relatively preserved, at least in the early stages of disease.

pri·mar·y pro·gres·sive a·pha·si·a

(PPA) (prī'mar-ē prŏ-gres'iv ă-fāz'ē-ă)
A degenerative disorder of which the early major symptom is an aphasia that increases in severity and (usually) eventually includes dementia.

primary progressive aphasia

An atypical form of DEMENTIA featuring progressive loss of the language function without severe memory loss, loss of visual and spacial skills or deterioration in behaviour. The defect is essentially one of word comprehension so that there is inexorable loss of the ability to find an appropriate word or name objects (anomia) or to employ normal syntax. The condition is associated with focal degeneration in the speech areas on the left temporal lobe of the brain, but it is not considered to be a subset of Alzheimer's disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
The analysis of patients with the semantic subtype of primary progressive aphasia, which is associated with marked temporopolar atrophy, revealed much more pronounced impairments of naming and matching.
This form of Alzheimer's disease, a logopenic primary progressive aphasia, is very similar to the language variant of frontotemporal dementia (primary progressive aphasia).
Terry, 74, has primary progressive aphasia, a form of dementia which robs sufferers of the ability to communicate.
Welsh-born Jones has primary progressive aphasia, a form of dementia that affects his ability to communicate.
Jones has been diagnosed with primary progressive aphasia, a type of dementia, that affects his ability to communicate.
These include nonfluent and semantic variants of primary progressive aphasia and a third behavioral variant.
A spokesman for the comedian said: "Terry has been diagnosed with primary progressive aphasia, a variant of frontotemporal dementia.
Alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer's disease variants, Primary Progressive Aphasia, Behavioral Variant-Frontotemporal Dementia, or Parkinsonism diseases) can be applied based on characteristics of the disease (Table 1).
Now fighting primary progressive aphasia - a form of cognitive impairment - he decides to take up the baton once more.
residents have behavior variant FTD or another FTD-related condition, primary progressive aphasia, according to AFTD.
Clinical Perspectives on Primary Progressive Aphasia
It broke down this way: Around 8 percent of those with Alzheimer's disease, 20 percent of those with Huntington's disease and 27 percent of those with a type of progressive aphasia had run-ins with the law.

Full browser ?