progestogen

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pro·ges·to·gen

(prō-jes'tō-jen),
1. Any agent capable of producing biologic effects similar to those of progesterone; most progestogens are steroids like the natural hormones.
2. A synthetic derivative from testosterone or progesterone that has some of the physiologic activity and pharmacologic effects of progesterone; progesterone is antiestrogenic, whereas some progestogens have estrogenic or androgenic properties in addition to progestational activity.
[pro- + gestation + G. -gen, producing]

progestogen

/pro·ges·to·gen/ (-jes´tah-jen) progestational agent.

progestogen

(prō-jĕs′tə-jən)
n.
Any of various substances having progestational effects, usually including both progesterone and the progestins.

progestogen

[-jes′təjən]
any natural or synthetic progestational hormone. Also spelled progestagen. Also called progestin.

pro·ges·to·gen

(prŏ-jes'tō-jen)
1. Any agent capable of producing biologic effects similar to those of progesterone; most progestogens are steroids like the natural hormones.
2. A synthetic derivative from testosterone or progesterone that has some of the physiologic activity and pharmacologic effects of progesterone; progesterone is antiestrogenic, whereas some progestogens have estrogenic or androgenic properties in addition to progestational activity.
Compare: bioregulator
[pro- + gestation + G. -gen, producing]

progestogen

One of a group of drugs chemically and pharmacologically similar to the natural hormone PROGESTERONE. They are used in oral contraceptives to interfere with ovulation, to alter the womb lining so that it is less receptive to a fertilized egg and to make the mucus in the cervix less readily penetrable by sperms. They are also used to treat menstrual disorders and cancers that are being promoted by oestrogens.

pro·ges·to·gen

(prŏ-jes'tō-jen)
Any agentcapable of producing biologic effects similar to those of progesterone; most are steroids, such as natural hormones.
[pro- + gestation + G. -gen, producing]

progestogen (prōjes´tōjen),

n an agent capable of producing effects similar to progesterone; used to correct abnormalities of the menstrual cycle.

progestogen

any substance having progestational activity.
References in periodicals archive ?
The sequential regimen means that estrogen (Es) is administered every day and progestogen (Pr) is used for 14 days (minimum 10 days).
introduction of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) as a referral method, o introduction of combined oestrogen and progestogen injectables;
Lidegaard and colleagues' previous study, which revealed similar differences in risk between levonorgestrel and the newer progestogens, argued that because no declining risk was seen after the first few months of use for women using levonorgestrel-containing pills, as would be expected, left-censoring bias might have occurred, making the risk of VTE associated with levonorgestrel seem artificially low compared with that seen with drospirenone, which was introduced in 2001.
In addition to being included in birth control pills and hormone replacement therapy, progestogens may be used to treat a variety of conditions, including:
Reports about progestogens are controversial and mostly derived from postmenauposal replacement and/or oral contraceptive studies, so they cannot be adopted directly for pregnant patients.
Hormone therapy and venous thromboembolism among postmenopausal women: The impact of the route of estrogen administration and progestogens.
Other studies have also suggested that women who use estrogen-progestogen therapy (EPT) are more likely to be given a diagnosis of lobular, rather than ductal, cancer, and that various dosages, routes of administration, frequency of use, and type of estrogen or progestogen differentially affect the type of breast cancer--although the reason for this intriguing observation is unknown.
Progestogens versus oestrogens and progestogens for irregular uterine bleeding associated with anovulation.
The only difference between "natural" progesterone and "synthetic" progestogens is that the latter have undergone additional steps in a lab to modify their chemical structure and activity in the body.
There were many different oestrogens and progestogens, and each may have different effects, they said.
We don't know if HRT-associated reductions in coronary disease and Alzheimer's disease in observational studies were due to healthy women taking hormones, or to estrogen effects that are vgriably attenuated by progestogens.
New Survey Finds Menopausal Women Are Getting Educated about Estrogens, but Unclear about the Role of Progestogens as Part of Their Treatment Options