profound deafness

(redirected from Profound hearing loss)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

profound deafness

A level of hearing loss in which a person cannot hear a sound unless it is at least 90 decibels loud (about as loud as a lawnmower or a nearby motorcycle).
See also: deafness
References in periodicals archive ?
0 per 1 000 live births for severe to profound hearing loss, and developing countries such as South Africa probably have an incidence at the upper end of that spectrum.
Patients with bilateral profound hearing loss secondary to fractures become candidates for cochlear implantation.
It's a technological miracle which has made the lives of children born with profound hearing loss as emotionally fulfilling, promising, and independent as that of children with normal hearing.
That is, bilateral profound hearing loss clearly has degenerative effects on the central auditory system and longer periods of congenital auditory deprivation have greater consequences than shorter periods of deafness or onset of hearing loss at an older age.
One reviewer was Ginny Kanka from Peckham, London, who has a profound hearing loss.
Types of compression are condensed and categorized for mild to moderate and for severe to profound hearing loss, and an example of a multichannel WDRC hearing aid is described.
Candidates for hybrid implants have a profound hearing loss at 1,500 Hz.
Sandra, a Valencia woman who has had profound hearing loss since she was a child and wears two high-powered hearing aids, welcomed Flash into her home last week.
The device is a safe, reliable and effective treatment for severe to profound hearing loss in adults and profound hearing loss in children.
About one to three in 1,000 infants have profound hearing loss, making it one of the most common disabilities in newborns.
Children with severe to profound hearing loss who have received cochlear implants are at increased risk of bacterial meningitis, but the complication is quite rare, according to a report in the July 31 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.