professor

(redirected from Professors)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
A member of the faculty at an institution of higher learning who has attained its highest possible academic rank and possesses special knowledge in an occupation requiring special skills

professor

Academia A member of the faculty at an institution of higher learning who has attained its highest possible academic rank, who possesses special knowledge in an occupation requiring special skills. See 'Chair. '. Cf, Lecturer.
References in classic literature ?
He knew it so well that he once astonished a professor of Oriental languages by repeating correctly a sentence of Sanscrit that had been written in "Visible Speech" characters.
Brown," an account of my attainments and character, which relieved him from all scruple as to the propriety of engaging me as professor of English and Latin in his establishment; nevertheless, for form's sake, he would put a few questions to test; my powers.
What with the physical shocks incidental to my first interview with Professor Challenger and the mental ones which accompanied the second, I was a somewhat demoralized journalist by the time I found myself in Enmore Park once more.
The professor was buried in his work and existed for nothing else.
Furthermore, Professor Caldwell did not realize Martin's concept of the average English professor.
Maybe you're thinking of joining forces with the professor again, as you did when you dug the big tunnel.
The Professor laughed violently: then he gazed at them through his great spectacles, for a minute or two, without speaking.
Frau Professor Erlin called her establishment a family and not a pension; but it would have required the subtlety of a metaphysician to find out exactly where the difference lay.
Most reprehensible, most reprehensible," exclaimed Professor Porter, with a faint trace of irritation in his voice.
The nearer the approach of the time when he might enter again upon those experiments which had now been neglected for the better part of a year the more self absorbed and moody became the professor.
The need which Professor Muirhead stressed is no less pressing to-day, and few will deny that philosophy has much to do with enabling us to meet it, although no one, least of all Muirhead himself, would regard that as the sole, or even the main, object of philosophy.
With him there was a well-known professor of philosophy, who had come from Harkov expressly to clear up a difference that had arisen between them on a very important philosophical question.