proopiomelanocortin

(redirected from Pro-opiomelanocortin)

pro·o·pi·o·mel·a·no·cor·tin (POMC),

(prō-ō'pē-ō-mel'ă-nō-kōr'tin), [MIM*176830]
A large molecule found in the anterior and intermediate lobes of the pituitary gland, the hypothalamus, and other parts of the brain as well as in the lungs, gastrointestinal tract, and placenta; the precursor of ACTH, CLIP, β-LPH, γ-MSH, β-endorphin, and met-enkephalin.

POMC

A gene on chromosome 2p23 that encodes proopiomelanocortin, the melanocortin family of hormones, which include alpha-, beta- and gamma-melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). The melanocortins bind to the melanocortin receptors, a group of five G protein-coupled receptors (MC1R to MC5R) which are involved in a wide range of physiological functions, including pigmentation, energy homeostasis, inflammation, immunomodulation, steroidogenesis and temperature control.

Molecular pathology
Defects of POMC are associated with susceptibility to obesity and proopiomelanocortin deficiency.

pro·o·pi·o·mel·a·no·cor·tin

(POMC) (prō-ō'pē-ō-mel'ă-nō-kōr'tin)
A large molecule found in the anterior and intermediate lobes of the pituitary gland, the hypothalamus, and other parts of the brain as well as in the lungs, gastrointestinal tract, and placenta.

proopiomelanocortin (POMC)

The prohormone from which ACTH, beta-lipotropin, and beta-ENDORPHIN are produced by cleavage. POMC is found most abundantly in the pituitary and hypothalamus, but also occurs in the sex glands and elsewhere.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lead scientist Professor Heisler said that the research focused on the cells in the area of the brain that made important brain hormones called pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) peptides, which controls one's appetite.
Lead scientist Professor Lora Heisler said that the research focused on the cells in the area of the brain that made important brain hormones called pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) peptides, which controls one's appetite.
According to the company, this expanded BTD is for the treatment of obesity associated with genetic defects upstream of the MC4 receptor in the leptin-melanocortin pathway (the MC4 pathway), which includes both pro-opiomelanocortin and leptin receptor deficiency obesity.
The present study was aimed at examining the role of hypothalamic neuropeptides genes expressions on body mass regulation under different photoperiods in Eothenomys miletus, body mass, food intake, serum leptin levels and hypothalamic neuropeptide neuropeptide Y (NPY), Agouti related peptide (AgRP), pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART) expressions were measured.
3] Estrogen acts on pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons, regulate their cellular activity through estrogen receptor (ER)a, and suppress food intake.
The gene's actions took place in pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc) neurons in the hypothalamic region of the brain.
7) The combination of naltrexone SR and bupropion SR simultaneously stimulates hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin neurons and blocks opioidmediated pro-opiomelanocortin autoinhibition.
Chronic daily ethanol consumption leads to 1) Chronically increased adrenal glucocorticoid activity 2) Decreased plasma testosterone 3) Decreased forebrain pro-opiomelanocortin gene expression.
It has been suggested that presumed Silent ACTHoma precursor cells represent a distinct subtype of Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) producing cells residing mostly in the vestigial pars intermedia of the human pituitary.
In the obese rats alpha-MSH was low, despite an abundance of leptin and despite normal levels of gene expression both for its biochemical precursor protein called pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and for a key enzyme called PC2 that processes POMC in brain cells.
Chronic ethanol consumption impairs the circadian rhythm of pro-opiomelanocortin and period genes mRNA expression in the hypothalamus of the male rat.
corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related peptide (AgRP), pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)) and fatty acid synthase (FAS).