privilege

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privilege

(prĭv′ĭ-lĭj) [L. privilegium, law affecting a single person, prerogative]
1. A right granted to a person in recognition of some special status, e.g., a right to practice one's profession in a health care facility.
2. An immunity from commonly imposed standards or laws.
References in periodicals archive ?
The software architecture provides no paths for injecting root kits or other malicious code intended to execute at the highest hardware privilege level.
Although not remotely exploitable in-and-of itself, a malicious user, network worm or email virus could take advantage of this vulnerability in order to completely compromise a vulnerable system on which the exploit code is executing, regardless of that code's original privilege level.
Parents love the points systems, privilege levels, and how the system is used to create lifelong patterns of positive behavior.
Three user privilege levels enhance security and management flexibility.
These connections are the lifeblood of the cybercriminals, who tap into the fact that the privilege levels of user IDs that interconnect with third-party systems invariably tend to be higher than direct external accounts.
In the beginning, we had everything locked down to just the Web site," says Gentilozzi, "and then over the course of a week, we worked out specific privilege levels for each user.
It also has full audit-trail capabilities and multitiered privilege levels for robust system security.
Also unique to the Director EC is the ability to set user privilege levels, allowing an administrator to limit the quantity of discs or jobs a user may submit; log any job; or assign priority levels which determine the users' place in the queue.
If they follow rules, cooperate with staff and participate in reasonable program assignments, they will be allowed to progress to higher privilege levels.
However, court-committed patients who were discharged had higher levels of functioning and more prior conditional releases, shorter hospitalizations, higher global functioning, higher privilege levels and were less likely to have personality disorders, commit assault, or be placed in restraints than guardianship patients who were discharged.
Internal Medicine Core criteria for privilege levels I, II, III, IV; Checklist + detailed privileging criteria for: Core criteria for Allergy and Immunology subspecialty III/IV privileges; Core criteria for Endocrinology and Metabolism subspecialty III/IV privileges;