privacy

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Related to Privacy rights: invasion of privacy

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē),
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.

privacy

[prī′vəsē]
a culturally specific concept defining the degree of one's personal responsibility to others in regulating behavior that is regarded as intrusive. Some privacy-regulating mechanisms are physical barriers (closed doors or drawn curtains, such as around a hospital bed) and interpersonal types (lowered voices or cessation of smoking).
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Privacy curtains help ensure patient's privacy

privacy

Seclusion, freedom from disturbance or interference. Privacy has two intertwined components in the context of healthcare:
(1) The patient’s rights and expectations that personal health information is shared only between professionals who need it to manage the patient; in the UK access to such information is monitored by the provider’s Caldicott Guardian; and
(2) The physical space, clothing and other measures taken to ensure that the private conversations remain so, and that patients’ dignity is preserved and embarrassment minimised by providing appropriate clothing.

Pronunciation
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, PRIV uh see
Medspeak-US: pronounced, PRY vuh see

privacy

NIHspeak Control over the extent, timing, and circumstances of sharing oneself–physically, behaviorally, or intellectually with others

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, but also in all fields of dentistry and health care, respect for confidential nature of the clinician-patient relationship.

privacy,

n a culturally specific concept defining the degree of one's personal responsibility to others in regulating behavior that is regarded as intrusive.

Patient discussion about privacy

Q. I am upset by the lack of privacy at dialysis centers. Does anyone see their nephrologist in private office? My nephrologist comes to see me and examine me while I am receiving dialysis. I understand his talking to me but the exam is objectionable and I am unable to ask personal questions because everyone is listening. I am told they are all old and don't hear us but that is patronizing and extremely rude. Are there rules against this? Why can't we have office visits where there is some privacy?

A. I live in Sault Ste Marie Ontario Canada and if you need to ask personal questions you can make an appointment to see your doctor in the clinic.
But when I was in Calgary Alberta they would make you a appointment every 3 months to see the doctor.

More discussions about privacy
References in periodicals archive ?
It is also illustrative of the continuing conundrum of privacy law, in general, and of computer privacy in particular: If a person believes that he or she has a privacy right or would be offended by an intrusion, such a right may exist if those expectations are consistent with the expectations of the hypothetical reasonable person whose actions and expectations are the plenary standard of the common law.
We understand there are some inaccuracies out there for statistical purposes; at the same time we are not willing to sacrifice student privacy rights for the sake of better information.
Offices will be required to provide evidence that staff has been trained on the organization's privacy policies procedures, patient's privacy rights and the consequence of violating established policies and procedures.
The issue of students' privacy rights is discussed so much and so often because there are no easy answers to the questions typically raised by school counselors who are concerned about students' ethical rights and the legal rights of parents.
But people in the technology industry counter that privacy catapulted to the top of the agenda in 2000 in large part because privacy rights advocates succeeded in sensationalizing the issue.
Cicero notes that in the majority of cases in which the courts have privileged privacy rights over free speech, the disclosed info was personal, not significant to public welfare.
Also related to this issue are questions as to whether the privacy rights of the roommates might be violated if a camera is installed in a room and whether the resident can turn the camera on and off to keep moments of intimate care, such as bathing and toileting, private.
26] With safeguards in place to protect the legal and privacy rights of citizens, organizations can use biometric systems with the cooperation of the public.
The carriers and manufacturers were caught last month willfully violating customers' privacy rights in direct violation of federal law.
Legal experts also said the drones could violate privacy rights if they are used to gather evidence for which law enforcement officials would normally need a search warrant.
None of this would have happened if Trinity hadn't violated my privacy rights by outing me to my parents without my consent.
pdf) focuses on the privacy rights individuals have under the rule.