privacy

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pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē),
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.

privacy

[prī′vəsē]
a culturally specific concept defining the degree of one's personal responsibility to others in regulating behavior that is regarded as intrusive. Some privacy-regulating mechanisms are physical barriers (closed doors or drawn curtains, such as around a hospital bed) and interpersonal types (lowered voices or cessation of smoking).
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Privacy curtains help ensure patient's privacy

privacy

Seclusion, freedom from disturbance or interference. Privacy has two intertwined components in the context of healthcare:
(1) The patient’s rights and expectations that personal health information is shared only between professionals who need it to manage the patient; in the UK access to such information is monitored by the provider’s Caldicott Guardian; and
(2) The physical space, clothing and other measures taken to ensure that the private conversations remain so, and that patients’ dignity is preserved and embarrassment minimised by providing appropriate clothing.

Pronunciation
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, PRIV uh see
Medspeak-US: pronounced, PRY vuh see

privacy

NIHspeak Control over the extent, timing, and circumstances of sharing oneself–physically, behaviorally, or intellectually with others

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, but also in all fields of dentistry and health care, respect for confidential nature of the clinician-patient relationship.

privacy,

n a culturally specific concept defining the degree of one's personal responsibility to others in regulating behavior that is regarded as intrusive.

Patient discussion about privacy

Q. I am upset by the lack of privacy at dialysis centers. Does anyone see their nephrologist in private office? My nephrologist comes to see me and examine me while I am receiving dialysis. I understand his talking to me but the exam is objectionable and I am unable to ask personal questions because everyone is listening. I am told they are all old and don't hear us but that is patronizing and extremely rude. Are there rules against this? Why can't we have office visits where there is some privacy?

A. I live in Sault Ste Marie Ontario Canada and if you need to ask personal questions you can make an appointment to see your doctor in the clinic.
But when I was in Calgary Alberta they would make you a appointment every 3 months to see the doctor.

More discussions about privacy
References in periodicals archive ?
The commissioner was particularly interested in learning how well the privacy policy was working from the perspective of university employees.
Capistrano and Chen (2015) investigated a wide variety of privacy policy characteristics involving complexity and how it affects consumers' perceptions of the privacy policies.
The privacy policy sites in the top ten list (in order from most popular) include Yahoo
If transferring the data would violate the privacy policy, then a company may wish to work with their privacy counsel to alter the policy to allow a transfer.
26, 2012, said that the "Fly Delta" mobile application, available through the Apple App Store and Google Play platforms, did not have a privacy policy reasonably accessible for consumers.
TRUSTe's free mobile privacy policy follows the company's introduction of the industry's first mobile privacy solution in 2011.
Therefore, the portion of the population reading at the twelfth grade level or below would have difficulty understanding the typical privacy policy.
When developing a privacy policy, it is necessary for a company to take an in depth look at what information their web site collects, how the information collected is being used, and its internal protocols and policies as they relate to information collection and use.
Cautionary tales that discuss past organizational privacy policy incidents reported by the media
Revisit your privacy policy from time to time to make sure that it is kept up to date.
AOL has since clarified and strengthened its privacy policy, but as McVeigh ruefully notes, "While [the Internet] offers significant advantages, certainly it doesn't come without its pitfalls.

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