privacy

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pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē),
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.

privacy

[prī′vəsē]
a culturally specific concept defining the degree of one's personal responsibility to others in regulating behavior that is regarded as intrusive. Some privacy-regulating mechanisms are physical barriers (closed doors or drawn curtains, such as around a hospital bed) and interpersonal types (lowered voices or cessation of smoking).
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Privacy curtains help ensure patient's privacy

privacy

Seclusion, freedom from disturbance or interference. Privacy has two intertwined components in the context of healthcare:
(1) The patient’s rights and expectations that personal health information is shared only between professionals who need it to manage the patient; in the UK access to such information is monitored by the provider’s Caldicott Guardian; and
(2) The physical space, clothing and other measures taken to ensure that the private conversations remain so, and that patients’ dignity is preserved and embarrassment minimised by providing appropriate clothing.

Pronunciation
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, PRIV uh see
Medspeak-US: pronounced, PRY vuh see

privacy

NIHspeak Control over the extent, timing, and circumstances of sharing oneself–physically, behaviorally, or intellectually with others

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, but also in all fields of dentistry and health care, respect for confidential nature of the clinician-patient relationship.

privacy,

n a culturally specific concept defining the degree of one's personal responsibility to others in regulating behavior that is regarded as intrusive.

Patient discussion about privacy

Q. I am upset by the lack of privacy at dialysis centers. Does anyone see their nephrologist in private office? My nephrologist comes to see me and examine me while I am receiving dialysis. I understand his talking to me but the exam is objectionable and I am unable to ask personal questions because everyone is listening. I am told they are all old and don't hear us but that is patronizing and extremely rude. Are there rules against this? Why can't we have office visits where there is some privacy?

A. I live in Sault Ste Marie Ontario Canada and if you need to ask personal questions you can make an appointment to see your doctor in the clinic.
But when I was in Calgary Alberta they would make you a appointment every 3 months to see the doctor.

More discussions about privacy
References in periodicals archive ?
Purchasers of companies or their consumer data should assure that the selling companies represent and warrant that they are in compliance with their data privacy policy, and that they are authorized to transfer the consumer data to the buyer.
The principles were intended to ensure that mobile applications comply with applicable privacy laws such as the California Online Privacy Protection Act and include the conspicuous posting of a privacy policy by mobile applications when required by law, a means to make the privacy policy available from the application platform before downloading, a way for users to report noncompliant applications plications to the application platform provider, a process to respond to these reports and a pledge to further work with the attorney general on best practices for mobile privacy.
disclosure of information regarding the independent certification of the online privacy policy, including what online privacy policy certification service is used,
A facility's privacy policy must include information relating to the uses and disclosures of the individual's PHI, including a description and one example for each of the types of uses and disclosures that the facility is permitted to make for the purposes of treatment, payment, and healthcare operations; a description of each of the other purposes that the facility is permitted or required to perform without consent, such as public health, governmental health oversight, judicial and administrative proceedings, law enforcement, and work-related illness or injury; and enough detail to clarify the uses and disclosures that are permitted or required by the Privacy Rule or other applicable laws.
com to sell personally identifiable information about its customers in violation of its privacy policy also received significant media attention.
MPP works by allowing consumers to apply their own "privacy policies" to all of their Web-based relationships, effectively superceding the privacy policy of any third party.
Possible consequences of not complying with the posted privacy policy would be the issuance of a cease and desist order or the imposition of civil fines.
E-Tours had a privacy policy that explicitly stated that collected information would not be made available to third parties.
Audit reports, however, also may list various findings, particularly weaknesses, to assist management in improving adherence to its privacy policy.
TPG's "Ohio Website Privacy Policy Review" determined if Ohio businesses are practicing good privacy policies when interacting with online consumers.
These combined services provide business, marketing and legal executives with a means to validate that their corporate brand standards are adhered to online, and to validate that the online business complies with industry privacy regulations and the company's own stated privacy policy for handling personally identifiable information (PII).

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