privacy

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pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē),
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.

privacy

[prī′vəsē]
a culturally specific concept defining the degree of one's personal responsibility to others in regulating behavior that is regarded as intrusive. Some privacy-regulating mechanisms are physical barriers (closed doors or drawn curtains, such as around a hospital bed) and interpersonal types (lowered voices or cessation of smoking).
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Privacy curtains help ensure patient's privacy

privacy

Seclusion, freedom from disturbance or interference. Privacy has two intertwined components in the context of healthcare:
(1) The patient’s rights and expectations that personal health information is shared only between professionals who need it to manage the patient; in the UK access to such information is monitored by the provider’s Caldicott Guardian; and
(2) The physical space, clothing and other measures taken to ensure that the private conversations remain so, and that patients’ dignity is preserved and embarrassment minimised by providing appropriate clothing.

Pronunciation
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, PRIV uh see
Medspeak-US: pronounced, PRY vuh see

privacy

NIHspeak Control over the extent, timing, and circumstances of sharing oneself–physically, behaviorally, or intellectually with others

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, but also in all fields of dentistry and health care, respect for confidential nature of the clinician-patient relationship.

privacy,

n a culturally specific concept defining the degree of one's personal responsibility to others in regulating behavior that is regarded as intrusive.

Patient discussion about privacy

Q. I am upset by the lack of privacy at dialysis centers. Does anyone see their nephrologist in private office? My nephrologist comes to see me and examine me while I am receiving dialysis. I understand his talking to me but the exam is objectionable and I am unable to ask personal questions because everyone is listening. I am told they are all old and don't hear us but that is patronizing and extremely rude. Are there rules against this? Why can't we have office visits where there is some privacy?

A. I live in Sault Ste Marie Ontario Canada and if you need to ask personal questions you can make an appointment to see your doctor in the clinic.
But when I was in Calgary Alberta they would make you a appointment every 3 months to see the doctor.

More discussions about privacy
References in periodicals archive ?
about security and privacy issues as they relate to RFID, in addition to associated technologies and processes.
Barker also previously served as a privacy consultant for Concert Communications, where he assessed human resources privacy issues and implemented solutions.
He describes privacy issues in real-life contexts and corresponds problems with potential solutions.
For American companies, dealing with the whole indirect taxation question is probably going to generate a much more complex problem than privacy issues," says De Baere.
Educate yourself further about privacy issues by signing on with the Center for Democracy and Technology (www.
City of Reno,(13) a federal district court addressed privacy issues relating to an "alpha-page" system, which is similar to an e-mail system.
I appreciated the constructive atmosphere of the Workshop to discuss privacy issues and wish to see proposed solutions being implemented and used in the future.
Varney is recognized internationally as a thought leader on online privacy issues and has in-depth knowledge about the tools consumers can use to better protect their privacy when holiday shopping on the Internet.
Data privacy issues may affect a number of areas of financial record-keeping, but the most common are customers, vendors and employees.
The interesting thing about this privacy issue is that sometimes you will never know when you've been discriminated against and why," explains Lori Fena, executive director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a San Francisco organization that examines privacy issues.
Because of BlueHornet's historically stringent position on consumer privacy issues and spam, eMS 4.

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