primitive

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primitive

 [prim´ĭ-tiv]
first in point of time; existing in a simple or early form that shows little complexity.

prim·i·tive

(prim'i-tiv),
Obsolete usage in embryology, replace by primordial.
[L. primitivus, fr. primus, first]

primitive

/prim·i·tive/ (prim´ĭ-tiv) first in point of time; existing in a simple or early form that shows little complexity.

primitive

[prim′itiv]
Etymology: L, primivus
1 undeveloped; undifferentiated; rudimentary; showing little or no evolution.
2 embryonic; formed early in the course of development; existing in an early or simple form. Compare definitive.

primitive

adjective Embrology Undifferentiated; undeveloped; before development of 1º germ layers–ectoderm, endoderm, mesoderm Psychiatry Pertaining to the early development of the personality

pri·mor·di·al

(prī-mōr'dē-ăl)
1. Relating to a primordium.
2. Relating to a structure in its first or earliest stage of development.
Synonym(s): primal (2) , primitive.

primitive

of ancient origin but present in modern organisms in an unmodified and unspecialized form.

primitive

first in point of time; existing in a simple or early form; showing little evolution.

primitive groove
longitudinal furrow in the primitive streak of the embryo.
primitive knot
primitive node
enlarged cranial end of the primitive streak.
primitive streak
the thickened median area of the epiblast which sets out the future longitudinal axis of the early embryo.
References in classic literature ?
In the very aspect of those primitive and rugged trees there was, methinks, a tanning principle which hardened and consolidated the fibers of men's thoughts.
Cut the primitive bed of a river abruptly with a canal hollowed out below its level, and the river will desert its bed.
Thus, very slowly, the ape-man commenced the tedious operation of putting a thin edge upon his primitive hunting-knife.
Tarzan went back into the forest a short distance until he had found a tree suited to his primitive requirements, and then, curling himself in a great crotch, he fell immediately into a deep sleep.
And not only did Borckman sense it, but it served as a spur to drive him back into primitive beastliness, and to fight to master this puppy as a primitive man, under dissimilar provocation, might have fought with the members of the first litter stolen from a wolf-den among the rocks.
All the inconceivable filth a child running at large in a primitive countryside may hear men utter was mine; and though I had never dared utter such oaths, they now poured from me, at the top of my lungs, as I cursed my father sitting there underground and gambling with long-haired, long-nailed Chinamen.
Their weapons were most primitive, consisting of rude spears tipped with pieces of metal pounded roughly into shape.
Among a primitive people, away from the cities--in the far and fertile West of the great American continent--I might live happily with my wife, and do good among my neighbors, secure of providing for our wants out of the modest little income which is almost useless to me here.
Also, and for all that he talked low without moving his hands, he was an animal, as you shall see--the beast primitive, the stupid, ferocious savage of the long ago that dressed in wild skins and lived in the caves along with the bears and wolves.
This alteration in the primitive form of the satellite was only perceptible for a few moments.
At the end of the Roman rule, as at its beginning, they appear divided into mutually jealous tribes, still largely barbarous and primitive.
Who ever saw his old clothes -- his old coat, actually worn out, resolved into its primitive elements, so that it was not a deed of charity to bestow it on some poor boy, by him perchance to be bestowed on some poorer still, or shall we say richer, who could do with less?