Primates


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Pri·ma·tes

(prī-mā'tēz),
The highest order of mammals, including humans, monkeys, and lemurs.
[L. primus, first]

Primates

/Pri·ma·tes/ (pri-ma´tēz) the highest order of mammals, including humans, apes, monkeys, and lemurs.

Primates

(prī-mā′tēz)
An order of vertebrates belonging to the class Mammalia, subclass Theria, including the lemurs, tarsiers, monkeys, apes, and humans. This order is most highly developed with respect to the brain and nervous system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Either way, at least one band of ancient African primates may have crossed the Atlantic Ocean, possibly after getting trapped on rafts of floating vegetation.
Using a safe and non-invasive technique known as "doubly labeled water," which tracks the body's production of carbon dioxide, the researchers measured the number of calories that primates burned over a 10 day period.
A team of scientists, led by Xijun Ni from the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, studied the skeleton and found it was seven million years older than the oldest fossil primate skeletons previously found.
The list of the world's 25 most endangered primates has been drawn up by primatologists working in the field who have first-hand knowledge of the causes of threats to primates.
We call on the Prime Minister to take action to ban the import of these primates and stop perpetuating this appalling cruelty.
In a European Commission survey, 80% of the public felt that using primates in laboratories was unacceptable.
Archbishop Andrew Hutchison, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, says that he is inclined to believe that the Archbishop of Canterbury will invite all bishops to the 2008 Lambeth Conference, regardless of their stances on the contentious issue of sexuality.
That this House welcomes International Primate Day on 1st September 2006 organized by Animal Defenders International; expresses its deep concern that the United States is the world's largest user of laboratory monkeys; highlights that the use of non-human primates is an unreliable predictor of likely human effects, as the disastrous TGN1412 has shown; is alarmed by the fact that the very existence of many primate species is threatened by the laboratory and pet trades as well as the use of primates for entertainment; calls on the federal government to push for a ban on primates in experiments; and further asks the federal government to support the Berlin Declaration calling for an end to primate experiments, which has been signed by over 85 organizations worldwide.
The current dogma surrounding retroviruses is that cross-species transmission is rare, but finding so many near-identical strains between humans and nonhuman primates suggests this is not a rare event.
To learn more about the aye-aye, read this fact sheet from the Duke University Primate Research Center: http://primatecenter.
The third lineage, which corresponds to the RV2 group, also contains rhadinoviruses of Old World nonhuman primates (chimpanzees, African green monkeys, macaques, baboons, mandrills, and our novel gibbon HyloRHV2).
Two million years is only a brief moment in evolutionary time, but the rift that has opened since then between ourselves and our fellow primates - modern apes, monkeys, lemurs, and lorises - is momentous on any scale.