Primates


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Pri·ma·tes

(prī-mā'tēz),
The highest order of mammals, including humans, monkeys, and lemurs.
[L. primus, first]

Primates

/Pri·ma·tes/ (pri-ma´tēz) the highest order of mammals, including humans, apes, monkeys, and lemurs.

Primates

(prī-mā′tēz)
An order of vertebrates belonging to the class Mammalia, subclass Theria, including the lemurs, tarsiers, monkeys, apes, and humans. This order is most highly developed with respect to the brain and nervous system.
References in periodicals archive ?
To find a skeleton like this, even though it appears a little scrappy, is an exciting discovery that brings a lot of new data to bear on the study of the origin and early evolution of primates," senior author Eric Sargis said in the Yale statement.
The RSPCA's senior scientific officer Ros Clubb said: "It doesn't matter how well-intentioned the owner is, primates are not suitable pets.
Either way, at least one band of ancient African primates may have crossed the Atlantic Ocean, possibly after getting trapped on rafts of floating vegetation.
An international team of scientists working with primates in zoos, sanctuaries, and in the wild examined daily energy expenditure in 17 primate species, from gorillas to mouse lemurs, to test whether primates' slow pace of life results from a slow metabolism.
Humankind's closest living relatives -- the world's apes, monkeys, lemurs and other primates -- are on the brink of extinction and in need of urgent conservation measures.
Aside from appalling physical suffering, primates experience fear, loneliness, frustration and stress from being kept in captivity.
In a European Commission survey, 80% of the public felt that using primates in laboratories was unacceptable.
Archbishop Andrew Hutchison, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, says that he is inclined to believe that the Archbishop of Canterbury will invite all bishops to the 2008 Lambeth Conference, regardless of their stances on the contentious issue of sexuality.
The current dogma surrounding retroviruses is that cross-species transmission is rare, but finding so many near-identical strains between humans and nonhuman primates suggests this is not a rare event.
To learn more about the aye-aye, read this fact sheet from the Duke University Primate Research Center: http://primatecenter.
Our work, which was published in the July 15 issue of Science, focused on the moral issues surrounding human to nonhuman primate neural grafting.
The third lineage, which corresponds to the RV2 group, also contains rhadinoviruses of Old World nonhuman primates (chimpanzees, African green monkeys, macaques, baboons, mandrills, and our novel gibbon HyloRHV2).