premolar

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Related to Premolar teeth: Incisor teeth

premolar

 [pre-mo´ler]
1. in front of the molar teeth.
2. premolar tooth; see tooth. Called also bicuspid.

pre·mo·lar

(prē-mō'lăr),
1. Anterior to a molar tooth.
2. A bicuspid tooth.

premolar

/pre·mo·lar/ (P) (-mo´ler)
1. see under tooth.
2. situated in front of the molar teeth.

premolar

(prē-mō′lər)
n.
One of eight bicuspid teeth located in pairs on each side of the upper and lower jaws behind the canines and in front of the molars.

pre·mo′lar adj.

premolar

[prēmō′lər]
Etymology: L, prae + mola, mill
one of eight teeth, four in each dental arch, located lateral and posterior to the canine teeth and anterior to the molars. They are smaller and shorter than the canine teeth. The crown of each premolar is compressed anteroposteriorly and surmounted by two cusps, and the neck is oval. The root is single and compressed in all premolars except the upper first, which usually has two roots. Usually an anterior and a posterior groove are also present. The upper premolars are larger than the lower premolars. Also called bicuspid. Compare canine tooth, incisor, molar.

pre·mo·lar

(prē-mō'lăr)
1. Anterior to a molar tooth.
2. Denotes permanent teeth that replace the deciduous molars.
3. See: bicuspid

pre·mo·lar

(prē-mō'lăr)
1. Anterior to a molar tooth.
2. Denotes permanent teeth that replace the deciduous molars.

premolar,

n (bicuspid), one of the 8 teeth, 4 in each jaw, between the canines and first molars; usually has 2 cusps; replaces the molars of the primary dentition. Older term:
bicuspid.

premolar

in front of the molar teeth. See also teeth.
References in periodicals archive ?
In our case primary lesion and mandibular metastasis were detected simultaneously, and mandibular metastasis probably grew up from the periapical region, resorbed the alveolar bone and then infiltrated to the gingival soft tissue around right premolar teeth.
Both premolar teeth are beveled in front, and tiny enamel fractures appear within smooth, polished areas on the sides and front of the teeth.
As many children exhibit low decay rates, the preferred long term restorative option for replacing missing premolar teeth is an implant-supported crown; the alveolus needed to support an implant must therefore be preserved.
Following patient informed consent, 30 extracted permanent single rooted human premolar teeth were collected.