Paleolithic diet

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Paleolithic diet

A diet that mimics the food choices of modern hunter-gatherer societies or primitive human cultures. It includes nuts, fruits, vegetables, wild game, and fish and typically derives about 21% of its calories from fat. See: evolution diet.
See also: diet
References in periodicals archive ?
Their research suggests that purple nut sedge (Cyperus rotundus) -- today regarded as a nuisance weed -- formed an important part of the prehistoric diet.
According to the chemical compounds and microfossils from dental calculus extracted from ancient teeth, purple nut sedge (Cyperus rotundus) - today regarded as a nuisance weed - formed an important part of the prehistoric diet.
13]C content of human collagen as a measure of prehistoric diet in Woodland North America.
That was the message from BBC1's new series The Truth About Food, which plonked a group of health-risk volunteers in a zoo compound and fed them a prehistoric diet of raw fruit and veg.
By the estimates of anthropologists, our prehistoric diet consisted of several hundred different plant species.
The identification of the epidermal fragments would greatly enhance our knowledge of that particular population and of prehistoric diet in general.
Debate is deadlocked because reconstruction of prehistoric diet remains largely speculative; most models are derived not from detailed analysis of an actual prehistoric pattern, but instead projected from ethnographic and human ecological patterns of contemporary groups.
A good example of this is the use of 13C/12C ratios to infer prehistoric diet.
Coprolites (dessicated human feces), however, are unique resources for determining the prehistoric diet of archaeological populations.
More recently, developments of various methodological tools and analytical procedures for studying the importance of plant foods in the past have started to provide means for reaching realistic estimates about the role of plant foods in early prehistoric diets.
Gardner, an investigator for a cultural resources management company in California, describe the science that assesses prehistoric diets to determine the biological and cultural implications of individuals as well as the population as whole, placing archeological interpretation into an anthropological context.