preemie

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Related to Preemies: Premature Babies

preemie

also

premie

(prē′mē)
n. Informal
A prematurely born infant.

preemie

pre·term in·fant

(prē'term in'fănt)
An infant with gestational age of fewer than 37 completed weeks (259 completed days).
Synonym(s): preemie, premature infant, premature newborn, preterm newborn.

preemie

, premie (prē′mē) [ prem(ature)]
A colloquial term for a baby born prematurely; a preterm baby.
References in periodicals archive ?
These four people, through their writing, advocacy, research, and work in the medical sphere have had an enormous impact on the lives of parents of preemies," Mr.
Angel Eye sells its platform to hospitals that then offer it as a free service to parents of preemies.
Also, the size and body composition, that is, the amount of fat and amount of lean tissue, of an infant piglet "are typically comparable to those of a human preemie," says Burrin.
Much of the recent US improvement comes from reducing elective early deliveries, leading to a drop in "late preemies," babies born a few weeks early.
While pediatricians are able to save preemies with the advancement in the neonatal technology, there is hardly any followup on their health later.
She and her colleagues randomly assigned parents of 146 preemies, born weighing under 2 kg (4 pounds, 6 ounces), to either take part in the programme or stick with standard care alone.
Since staying home is not always an option for parents, preemies need protection from germs in the air, on surfaces, and on well-meaning admirer's hands.
Mckenzie has since visited the NICU to view the preemies in their incubators, and she wanted to do something to help the babies' parents cope with the high cost of modern life-support treatment.
Similarly, the hepatitis B vaccine, when given at birth, isn't as effective in preemies as in full-term infants.
Of course, under the 14th Amendment legal personhood begins at birth, even of preemies at 25 weeks.
Adults need only 14 to 18 breathes per minute, but preemies need 45 to 50 to get things cleared and going.
He relays how experienced neonatal intensive care nurses are able to observe and see patterns in preemies regarding their health status well before inexperienced nurses who depend on data.