preconscious

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preconscious

 [pre-kon´shus]
the part of the mind that is not in immediate awareness but can be consciously recalled with effort, one of the systems of Freud's topographic model of the mind.

pre·con·scious

(prē-kon'shŭs),
In psychoanalysis, one of the three divisions of the psyche according to Freud's topographic psychology, the other two being the conscious and unconscious; includes all ideas, thoughts, past experiences, and other memory impressions that with effort can be consciously recalled. Compare: foreconscious.

preconscious

/pre·con·scious/ (-kon´shus) the part of the mind not present in consciousness, but readily recalled into it.

preconscious

(prē-kŏn′shəs)
n.
The memories or feelings that are not part of one's immediate awareness but that can be recalled through conscious effort.

pre·con′scious adj.
pre·con′scious·ly adv.

preconscious

[-kon′shəs]
Etymology: L, prae, before, conscire, to be aware
1 adj, before the development of self-consciousness and self-awareness.
2 n, (in psychiatry) the mental function in which thoughts, ideas, emotions, or memories not in immediate awareness can be brought into the consciousness, usually through associations, without encountering any intrapsychic resistance or repression.
3 n, the mental phenomena capable of being recalled, although not present in the conscious mind.

preconscious

Psychiatry adjective Referring to thoughts that are not in immediate awareness but that can be recalled by conscious effort

pre·con·scious

(prē-kon'shŭs)
psychoanalysis One of the three divisions of the psyche, the other two being the conscious and unconscious; includes all ideas, thoughts, past experiences, and other memory impressions that with effort can be consciously recalled.
Compare: foreconscious
References in periodicals archive ?
It's an if (Jails exhibition of the inventions in his collection represented the preconsciousness of that globalism.
The last sentence, 'She lies down beside him because he is not yet a man', suggests infinite doors of regression into a vegetable-animal state of preconsciousness, what Erich Fromm called 'escape from freedom'.
Religion's narrative is dualistic (we can only make sense of the world by appeal to something supernatural); mysterious (there is an ultimate mystery at the heart of the universe, a preconceptual domain that is not itself conceptualizable); personal (the supernatural preconceptual ground of our own existence is a person who cares for us; as Maritain was always to insist, there is a spiritual preconsciousness, an important sense in which the "I" always existed in God); and involves grace (humanity needs divine aid in order to deal with the human predicament).