precognition

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Related to Precognitions: Precognitive dreams, Premonitions

precognition

 [pre″kog-nish´un]
the extrasensory perception of a future event.

pre·cog·ni·tion

(prē'kog-nish'ŭn),
Advance knowledge, by means other than the normal senses, of a future event; a form of extrasensory perception.
[L. praecogito, to ponder before]

precognition

/pre·cog·ni·tion/ (pre″kog-nish´un) extrasensory perception of a future event.

precognition

[-kognish′ən]
the alleged intuitive foreknowledge of events. Compare premonition.

precognition

Forensics
A term of art used in Scottish courts for a preliminary statement by a witness; a pre-court evidentiary statement which may be given by medical or nursing staff to a the Procurator Fiscal in criminal proceedings or in a Fatal Accident Inquiry.

Paranormal
The alleged foreknowledge of an event; clairvoyance, especially by extrasensory perception.

pre·cog·ni·tion

(prē'kog-nish'ŭn)
Advance knowledge, by means other than the normal senses, of a future event; a form of extrasensory perception.
[L. praecogito, to ponder before]

pre·cog·ni·tion

(prē'kog-nish'ŭn)
Advance knowledge, by means other than the normal senses, of a future event; a form of extrasensory perception.
[L. praecogito, to ponder before]
References in periodicals archive ?
In the clairvoyance condition, there were 17 direct hits and in the precognition condition, there were 16.
There was no such effect evident in the precognition condition, where the sum of ranks analysis yielded only chance results, SOR 194.
Aanalyses of these personality characteristics in the current experiment likewise revealed that none of these personality types correlated with better scoring in either the clairvoyance or the precognition condition.
Another point of interest in this experiment is whether participants (presumably unconsciously) made an attempt at inference in the precognition condition, but that overall, the complexity made this inference too difficult.
The findings from this study appear to indicate that true precognition does not work; there was no evidence that people could predict the target when the target was determined by performing calculations on randomly selected stock market and temperature figures from a prespecified future date.
First, they suggest that theoretical worries about backward causation in relation to precognition are unfounded because the future is not directly perceived.