preceptor

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preceptor

 [pre-sep´ter]
a person who guides, tutors, and provides direction aimed at a specific performance.
employee preceptor in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as assisting and supporting a new or transferred employee through a planned orientation to a specific clinical area.
student preceptor in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as assisting and supporting learning experiences for a student.

preceptor

(prĭ-sĕp′tər, prē′sĕp′tər)
n.
1. A teacher; an instructor.
2. An expert or specialist, such as a physician, who gives practical experience and training to a student, especially of medicine or nursing.
3. The head of a preceptory.

pre′cep·to′ri·al (prē′sĕp-tôr′ē-əl) adj.
pre′cep·to′ri·al·ly adv.

preceptor

An instructor or specialist who teaches, counsels, and serves as a role model and supports the growth and development of an initiate in a particular discipline for a limited time, with the specific purpose of socialising the novice in a new role. Preceptors fill the same role as mentors, but for a more limited time frame.

pre·cep·tor

(prē'sep-tŏr)
An experienced nurse, physician, or other health care professional who guides and teaches those less experienced, including students; mentor.

preceptor

an instructor. Common usage of the term is that of a skilled practitioner or veterinarian in other field of work who gives one-to-one in-service training to undergraduate students in their practices or other places of work.
References in periodicals archive ?
His preceptress was Lady Wang of Purple Tenuity, but some of the teachings connected with him in his biography are at variance with standard Shangqing teachings.
The book opens years later when Claire is graduating from L Seminary in Connecticut, where she has flourished for six years under the refining care of its preceptress, Miss Maria Ellwood, Nellie Tracy's schoolmate.
In the 1860s, courses in Natural Theology and Evidences of Christianity were required, chapel was standing room only, Professor Sterling held public prayer meetings in his lecture room, and the Preceptress led kneeling girls in prayer meetings, Sunday Bible lessons, and attendance at local church services (407).